Archive for the ‘Adoration’ Category

12/01/2006

d V in D.C. !


What a way to celebrate Christmas — with the Magi!

If you’ll be in Washington D.C. next week,

don’t miss the chance to see Leonardo’s preparation drawing for
the Adoration of the Magi.

It’s the first ever public viewing outside of Italia.

Two days only! Thursday, Dec. 7 and Friday, Dec. 8,
From 10 a.m. to 5 p.m. at The Library of Congress, in the Northwest Pavilion on the second floor of the Thomas Jefferson Building, 10 First St. S.E., Washington, D.C.

The viewing is free and open to the public; no tickets or reservations are needed.

This preparatory drawing from the Uffizi, and the recently discovered drawings hidden beneath the amber brown surface of


the Adoration painting also in the Uffizi,

“bring insight into Leonardo’s techniques helps us to grasp the real dimension of his genius and to better understand why he was able to look further than any of the other great figures of the Renaissance.”
-P.R.

And while you’re in D.C. – go pay Ginevra a visit.

Please don’t make her jealous of the Magi, she already looks sad and lonely enough, no?

-Edward & Ginevra, (in my dreams!)

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12/01/2006

d V in D.C. !


What a way to celebrate Christmas — with the Magi!

If you’ll be in Washington D.C. next week,

don’t miss the chance to see Leonardo’s preparation drawing for
the Adoration of the Magi.

It’s the first ever public viewing outside of Italia.

Two days only! Thursday, Dec. 7 and Friday, Dec. 8,
From 10 a.m. to 5 p.m. at The Library of Congress, in the Northwest Pavilion on the second floor of the Thomas Jefferson Building, 10 First St. S.E., Washington, D.C.

The viewing is free and open to the public; no tickets or reservations are needed.

This preparatory drawing from the Uffizi, and the recently discovered drawings hidden beneath the amber brown surface of


the Adoration painting also in the Uffizi,

“bring insight into Leonardo’s techniques helps us to grasp the real dimension of his genius and to better understand why he was able to look further than any of the other great figures of the Renaissance.”
-P.R.

And while you’re in D.C. – go pay Ginevra a visit.

Please don’t make her jealous of the Magi, she already looks sad and lonely enough, no?

-Edward & Ginevra, (in my dreams!)