Archive for the ‘architecture and music’ Category

Peter Eisenman sing-along at Yale

12/10/2008
https://i1.wp.com/www.observer.com/files/imagecache/article/files/Transfers-PeterEisenman1V.jpg

The syllabus for the course Peter Eisenman is teaching at Yale

Yale University – Fall 2008 – Prof. Peter Eisenman
801a: Introduction to Visual Studies: Critical Composition
Drawing, Seeing, Reading

says for the class this Thursday (the last session) :

Thursday, 11 December 2008, 5:30 PM
Sing-along: Required attendance.

How festive! Will someone record this and put it on Youtube?

Can Peter Eisenman sing? If not, will we discover new revelations in the relationship between architecture and music?
.

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Music and Frank Lloyd Wright

10/16/2008

Always interested in the intersection of architecture and music, and in edification, I give you this

“Frank Lloyd Wright playlist”
  • “Building a Mystery” by Sarah McLachlan
  • “(She’s a) Brick House” by Rick James
  • “Mother Nature’s Son” by the Beatles
  • “Let the Sunshine In” by the 5th Dimension
  • “Inside Out” by REM
  • “Square One” by Coldplay
  • “Turning Japanese” by the Vapors
  • “Goodbye Pork Pie Hat” by Charles Mingus
  • “Here I Dreamt I Was an Architect” by The Decemberists
  • “So Long, Frank Lloyd Wright” by Simon & Garfunkel
Any additions?

The list is from this fine blog from the “curator’s corner” of Wright’s fine Darwin Martin house in Buffalo, N.Y.


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Miles Davis also said

10/08/2008

Do not fear mistakes. There are none.


Miles Davis said

10/08/2008

Don’t play what’s there, play what’s not there.

Great modernist architects do the same.
.

05/27/2007

Disney Hall for DJ Spooky, Amon Tobin, and
Cut Chemist.

You want fries with that?


For the LA Phil’s Shadow of Stalin series they and other artists remixed Shostakovich, Prokofiev and Mosolov. While other parts of the series look fascinating, this event didn’t explore much about Stalin, or the former Soviet Union. Sampled video clips from ‘Nevsky,’ ‘Potemkin,’ etc. played on two large screens front and rear, but they weren’t synched with the music and repeated too often and too randomly. It all felt random: music about music, about dance, about trance – forced into the LA Phil’s Stalin series.

One of my favorite parts was Norton Wisdom, (nice website.) He painted to the music, live onstage, as he has done with Butoh dance, Tibetan, Indian and Indonesian music, and various genres. You can vaguely see him in the bottom of the bad cellphone photo above. It seemed he had a large glass, onto which he brushed or used his fingers or a cloth to create dark, brooding, sexy images; with a bomb surprisingly added or an Uncle Sam arguing with Uncle Joe Stalin. Nice to watch them grow, and when you thought he should stop he’d make them better. Then Wisdom would wipe the images away glass with a cloth and beautiful back and forth gestures. (I always love to see window-washers work.) And he did listen to what the musicians were playing and trying to work with it. He made me think of opera, in which music and images blend.

If you like loud, I hope you were in Disney Hall last night, between about 10 pm, when it started, to past 3 am when it might have ended. I’m glad I was there. But the musicians wasted an opportunity; there they were, in Walt Disney Concert Hall with its miraculous acoustics, given an important theme to explore. They ignored both.
-E

A side performance in a ‘side chapel’ in the arts cathedral of
Disney Hall:

02/21/2007



Architects and Music

More since the last post.

Rafael Vinoly, who is now designing an opera for Chicago, and in the past designed the Kimmel Center where the Philadelphia orchestra plays, and he designed Jazz at Lincoln Center at Columbus Circle in New York, trained for a career as a pianist. His father ran the Teatro Colón in Argentina. I’m supposed to interview Vinoly soon, and I’ll ask him the role music plays a role in his design of spaces. As one who works a lot with words I’m interested in the essentially wordless artforms of architecture and music. Of course words have space and music to them too.

Daniel Libeskind, whom I mentioned also designed opera, also trained and performed as a professional pianist. He told me, as we walked through his Jewish Museum in Berlin together, that music is part of that architecture, and that he was conscious of designing spaces that would have a certain acoustic, a certain “sound” to them, even when “empty” or “void.” And then of course, they resonate when sound is created within.

I wonder about other close relationships between architects and music?

02/21/2007



Architects and Music

More since the last post.

Rafael Vinoly, who is now designing an opera for Chicago, and in the past designed the Kimmel Center where the Philadelphia orchestra plays, and he designed Jazz at Lincoln Center at Columbus Circle in New York, trained for a career as a pianist. His father ran the Teatro Colón in Argentina. I’m supposed to interview Vinoly soon, and I’ll ask him the role music plays a role in his design of spaces. As one who works a lot with words I’m interested in the essentially wordless artforms of architecture and music. Of course words have space and music to them too.

Daniel Libeskind, whom I mentioned also designed opera, also trained and performed as a professional pianist. He told me, as we walked through his Jewish Museum in Berlin together, that music is part of that architecture, and that he was conscious of designing spaces that would have a certain acoustic, a certain “sound” to them, even when “empty” or “void.” And then of course, they resonate when sound is created within.

I wonder about other close relationships between architects and music?

02/20/2007


Rafael! The Return of Vi
ñoly

Starchitect Rafael Viñoly has designed a production of Monteverdi’s The Return of Ulysses. It will open March 28th at Chicago Opera Theater.

COT’s marketing department writes, “His flair for breathtaking drama shows in his buildings…. Now the renowned architect Rafael Viñoly unleashes his creativity on Homer’s story of Ulysses.”

Vinoly returns to Daleyville, after his much-praised

Graduate School of Business at the University of Chicago (across the street from Frank Lloyd Wright’s Robie House.) Vinoly is also working on a hospital building for the University of Chicago, scheduled to open in 2011. It’ll feature a “Sky Garden” with broad views of Washington Park and the University of Chicago campus.

I’m always interested in the confluence of Architecture and Music. In fact, I’ll be talking about it at Frank Lloyd Wright’s Unity Temple on March 31, in a benefit for the Unity Temple Restoration Foundation.

I’m looking forward to seeing Vinoly’s Ulysses three days earlier. A happy coincidence .
Architects and Opera? In 2002 I saw

Daniel Libeskind’s Saint Francis of Assisi (Messian) at the Deutsche Oper Berlin. I found that a little too mechanistic in design and movement, and less revealing or supportive of the music.

I’m curious to see what Vinoly will do. His
Kimmel Center for the Performing Arts in Philadelphia is musical architecture.

Chicago Opera Theater run by Brian (“[I managed to catch Vinoly] for a moment during his crazy schedule of zooming around the world as architects do these days,”) Dickie, with Jane Glover conducting, is one of the top cultural organizations here. Their Nixon in China last year was unforgettably, mind-blowingly searingly good culture. They brought out the drama in that repetitive work by John Adams with superb singing, staging and many tv sets in a line across the stage. They made the normally pallid Harris Theater stage sing. Their contemporary staging worked well in that simple straightforward space.

Of course, the most symbiotic relationship would be between


Tosca and the church in Rome in which it opens,

Sant’Andrea della Valle.
Try walking into there and not hearing music!

St. Francis photo © Bernd Uhlig

02/20/2007


Rafael! The Return of Vi
ñoly

Starchitect Rafael Viñoly has designed a production of Monteverdi’s The Return of Ulysses. It will open March 28th at Chicago Opera Theater.

COT’s marketing department writes, “His flair for breathtaking drama shows in his buildings…. Now the renowned architect Rafael Viñoly unleashes his creativity on Homer’s story of Ulysses.”

Vinoly returns to Daleyville, after his much-praised

Graduate School of Business at the University of Chicago (across the street from Frank Lloyd Wright’s Robie House.) Vinoly is also working on a hospital building for the University of Chicago, scheduled to open in 2011. It’ll feature a “Sky Garden” with broad views of Washington Park and the University of Chicago campus.

I’m always interested in the confluence of Architecture and Music. In fact, I’ll be talking about it at Frank Lloyd Wright’s Unity Temple on March 31, in a benefit for the Unity Temple Restoration Foundation.

I’m looking forward to seeing Vinoly’s Ulysses three days earlier. A happy coincidence .
Architects and Opera? In 2002 I saw

Daniel Libeskind’s Saint Francis of Assisi (Messian) at the Deutsche Oper Berlin. I found that a little too mechanistic in design and movement, and less revealing or supportive of the music.

I’m curious to see what Vinoly will do. His
Kimmel Center for the Performing Arts in Philadelphia is musical architecture.

Chicago Opera Theater run by Brian (“[I managed to catch Vinoly] for a moment during his crazy schedule of zooming around the world as architects do these days,”) Dickie, with Jane Glover conducting, is one of the top cultural organizations here. Their Nixon in China last year was unforgettably, mind-blowingly searingly good culture. They brought out the drama in that repetitive work by John Adams with superb singing, staging and many tv sets in a line across the stage. They made the normally pallid Harris Theater stage sing. Their contemporary staging worked well in that simple straightforward space.

Of course, the most symbiotic relationship would be between


Tosca and the church in Rome in which it opens,

Sant’Andrea della Valle.
Try walking into there and not hearing music!

St. Francis photo © Bernd Uhlig

09/03/2006

Mr. Sullivan, thank you for your gifts.

Walking around today on this, Louis Sullivan’s 150th birthday.

I ducked into his

to say hello.

Carson’s department store entrance looks like the entryway to a modern middle ages cathedral, doesn’t it?

The light through those quatrefoil shaped windows above, changed my mood.
Took me on a trip, at least to France, if not beyond.
Like the German expression, I felt as comfortable “as G-d in France!”

I looked through the glass and felt the generations of urbanistic thought filtered through one artist – Louis Sullivan. His French ancestry came through, as did the nature-based spirit of his contemporaries from Transcendentalist New England.

Blues and yellows penetrated the glass,
the ornament was alive and curved sinuously, like

Jane Avril dancing at the Moulin Rouge

I danced, back outside, to State Street.
Chicago in the late summer air
but only along Louis Sullivan’s building,

felt very Parisian. State Street, ‘Boulevard de l’Etat’.

A street musician blew jazz into the air.
The notes swirled around Louis’ facade.

I gave him a dollar, and asked him to play ‘Happy Birthday.’

-Edoardo