Archive for the ‘Blair Kamin’ Category

Bertrand Goldberg’s masterworks at risk

04/14/2008

Blair Kamin points out threats to two Goldberg structures.
An “architecturally-disruptive incursion from Dick’s Last Resort” at Goldberg’s Marina City; and the possible demolition of two little-known Goldberg buildings at the Elgin, Illinois Mental Health Center.

Also at great peril, last time I checked, is


Goldberg’s marvelous Prentice Women’s Hopsital on Chicago’s Gold Coast. It ought to be saved. Northwestern Memorial Hospital owns it. What’s the latest on the status of this Chicago treasure that enlivens a rather boxy near-north side neighborhood?

Dwell Magazine wrote on the great work of Bertrand Goldberg recently.


And if these demolitions occur, it would not be the first time that we tear down an architect’s important work, even as we honor him or her. The Art Institute of Chicago plans a major Bertrand Goldberg retrospective in the fall of 2010 in its new architecture galleries to open in the Renzo Piano-designed new wing.
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Six critics in search of American Architecture

02/12/2008


L.A. is the most interesting city in the country right now, because of what’s happening with its urbanism, more than its architecture,” states Christopher Hawthorne, who has been the architecture critic of the Los Angeles Times for three years. The city that became synonymous with sprawl has “hit the limits of its growth and is turning back on itself. But it’s not just getting denser; it’s having to redefine itself as a city.”

“We now live in a culture of infinite choices,” says Chicago Tribune’s architecture critic, Blair Kamin. “You go to Home Depot and there are 60 different kinds of floors you can put in your basement, whereas in 1950 you would have had two. A lot of our architecture is like that.”

“Dallas is a very image-conscious place, and it has always been looking to headlines,” says David Dillon, who writes on architecture for The Dallas Morning News.

“Buildings here in Atlanta remain disappointing, with a few exceptions,” states Catherine Fox, the art and architecture critic for the Atlanta Journal-Constitution.

“I don’t see the regional differences in design that were apparent in the past,” states Paul Goldberger when asked what American architecture looks like from his perspective at The New Yorker. “Trends today are national or even global. Sustainability is certainly one. We should be doing more on this, but we’re doing more than we did in the past.”

Robert Campbell, longtime architecture critic for The Boston Globe likes the ideas in Office dA’s Macallen building, a condominium development that opened in 2007 in South Boston.


Photo © John Horner

Read more from each here.

10/27/2006


Kudos to the Tribune’s Blair Kamin for pressing the Donald on the advertising sign he put in the public way. He’s right, it’s an awful precedent.

I’ve never liked those “City Information” signs Daley allows the French company J.C. Decaux to put up on our sidewalks. They’re visual clutter, and the advertising assaults the senses and cheapens the experience of walking through the city. The city is not a shopping mall. Frankly, they don’t belong there either. But Trump’s is probably the worst one – pointing the way to and advertising his expensive condos in his unfortunate building.

I think what Trump doesn’t understand is that despite its mercantile nature, Chicago also has the mercy of enlightened urbanism.

What has always surprised me is that, getting off of the Edens expressway, or the Dan Ryan, to enter downtown Chicago – one is not assaulted by a myriad of advertising signs. Just beautiful buildings; at night they’re nicely lit.

This is not New York style. In New York, the advertising is everywhere. They compete and compete and cry out for attention. Like Donald. With his building named after himself. We don’t do that here either.

-Edward

More kudos to the Trib for putting the Abakanowicz story and photo on page one, above the fold! (Will “above the fold” sound like “dial the number” in the internet era? And why was the Abakanowicz so downplayed on the website? Is it a better photo for a paper than a website? Or just a different editor?)

When I opened the Trib (paper version!), and saw the photo of the Wrigley building accompanying Blair’s story, I thought it would be a story on the plan to glass in the courtyard of the Wrigley building and turn it into a galleria. That plan exists. I think, if done right, it’s a good one.

One last note on Trump – The slick, overdone, tasteless glitz of his sign – reflective metal like overly- priced jewelry – is not a good sign for the materials to be used on the enormous building.

Chicago Tribune photo by Geoffrey Black

10/27/2006


Kudos to the Tribune’s Blair Kamin for pressing the Donald on the advertising sign he put in the public way. He’s right, it’s an awful precedent.

I’ve never liked those “City Information” signs Daley allows the French company J.C. Decaux to put up on our sidewalks. They’re visual clutter, and the advertising assaults the senses and cheapens the experience of walking through the city. The city is not a shopping mall. Frankly, they don’t belong there either. But Trump’s is probably the worst one – pointing the way to and advertising his expensive condos in his unfortunate building.

I think what Trump doesn’t understand is that despite its mercantile nature, Chicago also has the mercy of enlightened urbanism.

What has always surprised me is that, getting off of the Edens expressway, or the Dan Ryan, to enter downtown Chicago – one is not assaulted by a myriad of advertising signs. Just beautiful buildings; at night they’re nicely lit.

This is not New York style. In New York, the advertising is everywhere. They compete and compete and cry out for attention. Like Donald. With his building named after himself. We don’t do that here either.

-Edward

More kudos to the Trib for putting the Abakanowicz story and photo on page one, above the fold! (Will “above the fold” sound like “dial the number” in the internet era? And why was the Abakanowicz so downplayed on the website? Is it a better photo for a paper than a website? Or just a different editor?)

When I opened the Trib (paper version!), and saw the photo of the Wrigley building accompanying Blair’s story, I thought it would be a story on the plan to glass in the courtyard of the Wrigley building and turn it into a galleria. That plan exists. I think, if done right, it’s a good one.

One last note on Trump – The slick, overdone, tasteless glitz of his sign – reflective metal like overly- priced jewelry – is not a good sign for the materials to be used on the enormous building.

Chicago Tribune photo by Geoffrey Black