Archive for the ‘Daley’ Category

02/02/2007

Chicago – Toronto


Maybe Bruce Mau heard this four part Canadian Broadcasting Corporation series.

Lessons from Chicago

“Chicago and Toronto are, in many ways, remarkably similar. These two cities on the Great Lakes were once industrial powerhouses, and are now trying to find their place in the modern economy. Toronto’s Mayor David Miller and Chicago’s Mayor Richard Daley have even become friends, visiting each other’s cities in recent years.

Both cities are facing huge waves of immigration, downtown condo booms, urban sprawl, and crumbling infrastructure.

In Toronto, City Hall struggles financially to improve everything from public parks to the waterfront. As a result, those spaces sit idle, or deteriorate.

Chicago is different. A history of protecting the waterfront and encouraging public art has led Chicago to think of innovative ways to improve its public space.”

One installment is called “The Trump Effect.”

He’s currently constructing a 92-storey luxury condominium in downtown Chicago. He’s also proposing an equally ambitious 70-storey tower for downtown Toronto. And Trump wants his condos to command top dollar. In both cities, some of Trump’s condos are selling for more than $1,000 per square foot. These are prices previously unheard of.

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02/02/2007

Chicago – Toronto


Maybe Bruce Mau heard this four part Canadian Broadcasting Corporation series.

Lessons from Chicago

“Chicago and Toronto are, in many ways, remarkably similar. These two cities on the Great Lakes were once industrial powerhouses, and are now trying to find their place in the modern economy. Toronto’s Mayor David Miller and Chicago’s Mayor Richard Daley have even become friends, visiting each other’s cities in recent years.

Both cities are facing huge waves of immigration, downtown condo booms, urban sprawl, and crumbling infrastructure.

In Toronto, City Hall struggles financially to improve everything from public parks to the waterfront. As a result, those spaces sit idle, or deteriorate.

Chicago is different. A history of protecting the waterfront and encouraging public art has led Chicago to think of innovative ways to improve its public space.”

One installment is called “The Trump Effect.”

He’s currently constructing a 92-storey luxury condominium in downtown Chicago. He’s also proposing an equally ambitious 70-storey tower for downtown Toronto. And Trump wants his condos to command top dollar. In both cities, some of Trump’s condos are selling for more than $1,000 per square foot. These are prices previously unheard of.

02/02/2007

Bruce Mau moving closer to Chicago’s Jolly Green Mayor! That’s the plan?

We had this back in November.
At the time Bruce Mau Design’s VP for Development commented,

Just a rumour, but we can’t deny that we’re looking to expand in the US imminently and that, yes, Chicago is a logical outpost, for five million reasons.
Great blog by the way.

Jim Shedden
VP, Development
Bruce Mau Design

And now it can be told. The Toronto Star reports that Bruce Mau Design will open a Chicago office before the end of June. [via] Interesting article for many reasons.

“Sources say there are other factors that make Chicago attractive. Increasingly since 9/11 high-end clients and partners prefer not to cross the border for a meeting. And Mau was seduced when Chicago, unlike his hometown, embraced Massive Change during its run at Chicago’s Museum of Contemporary Art last year.

“The light went on for both of us when we saw how everyone in Chicago, including the mayor, the artists and senior management teams, embraced Bruce,” says Mau’s business partner, Miles Nadal.
Mau and his wife, Aiyemobisi Williams, have told friends they are shopping for a house in Chicago and looking for schools for their three children.

According to Joanne Balles Crosbie, president of Bruce Mau Design, the idea of moving his family to Chicago is under consideration but has not been finalized. And the firm will keep its Toronto office open even if Mau does not reside here.”

And the word is his firm will work with Chicago Mayor Richard M. Daley on the 2009 centennial celebration of the publication of Daniel Burnham‘s “The Plan of Chicago.”

Lynn gets it right, as usual,

“If Mau is expecting the type of fawning he received here to continue in perpetuity, he’ll be in for rude awakening. Chicago, ultimately, is a tough town, with an allergy for puffery no matter how well intentioned. Massive Change was Mau’s Chicago romantic courtship. …

Still, Chicago was built by people who grew tired of where they came from and fell in love with the city, in all its contradictions. Think Sullivan, Mies, Daniel Burnham. If Mau can disenthrall himself from the flatterers – sycophancy is one of Chicago’s baser failings – and really engage the city, warts and all, he could be the next name in that line.”

I know we’re going to see “green” sprout all over here. So the time is right for Mau, now. Daley‘s Dad, Richard I, was content to just

turn the river green once a year and talk about workers downtown one day fishing in it for their lunches. That hasn’t quite happened yet, but, his son the current Mayor wants to turn the whole city green!


Not like this, I mean as in sustainable architecture….
(You know he’s Irish-American, born on Arbor Day – Richard M. Daley)

Good idea. And Mau has a few good ideas too.

-Edwardo

02/02/2007

Bruce Mau moving closer to Chicago’s Jolly Green Mayor! That’s the plan?

We had this back in November.
At the time Bruce Mau Design’s VP for Development commented,

Just a rumour, but we can’t deny that we’re looking to expand in the US imminently and that, yes, Chicago is a logical outpost, for five million reasons.
Great blog by the way.

Jim Shedden
VP, Development
Bruce Mau Design

And now it can be told. The Toronto Star reports that Bruce Mau Design will open a Chicago office before the end of June. [via] Interesting article for many reasons.

“Sources say there are other factors that make Chicago attractive. Increasingly since 9/11 high-end clients and partners prefer not to cross the border for a meeting. And Mau was seduced when Chicago, unlike his hometown, embraced Massive Change during its run at Chicago’s Museum of Contemporary Art last year.

“The light went on for both of us when we saw how everyone in Chicago, including the mayor, the artists and senior management teams, embraced Bruce,” says Mau’s business partner, Miles Nadal.
Mau and his wife, Aiyemobisi Williams, have told friends they are shopping for a house in Chicago and looking for schools for their three children.

According to Joanne Balles Crosbie, president of Bruce Mau Design, the idea of moving his family to Chicago is under consideration but has not been finalized. And the firm will keep its Toronto office open even if Mau does not reside here.”

And the word is his firm will work with Chicago Mayor Richard M. Daley on the 2009 centennial celebration of the publication of Daniel Burnham‘s “The Plan of Chicago.”

Lynn gets it right, as usual,

“If Mau is expecting the type of fawning he received here to continue in perpetuity, he’ll be in for rude awakening. Chicago, ultimately, is a tough town, with an allergy for puffery no matter how well intentioned. Massive Change was Mau’s Chicago romantic courtship. …

Still, Chicago was built by people who grew tired of where they came from and fell in love with the city, in all its contradictions. Think Sullivan, Mies, Daniel Burnham. If Mau can disenthrall himself from the flatterers – sycophancy is one of Chicago’s baser failings – and really engage the city, warts and all, he could be the next name in that line.”

I know we’re going to see “green” sprout all over here. So the time is right for Mau, now. Daley‘s Dad, Richard I, was content to just

turn the river green once a year and talk about workers downtown one day fishing in it for their lunches. That hasn’t quite happened yet, but, his son the current Mayor wants to turn the whole city green!


Not like this, I mean as in sustainable architecture….
(You know he’s Irish-American, born on Arbor Day – Richard M. Daley)

Good idea. And Mau has a few good ideas too.

-Edwardo

12/22/2006

Italians need light
——-> how about a moving mirror in winter? Look at this –

Just north of Turin,



Now you thought Italians

knew everything about how to build a town, right?

Well Viganella was built at the bottom of a valley in the Alps.
Every year around November 11th the sun stops shining on this town, and it doesn’t come back until about February 2nd! In between, for all those weeks, no sunlight falls on this town. And you thought your winter was bad.

“It’s like Siberia,” one woman told the BBC – and this is Italy.

So after about 800 years of this, the mayor of Viganella plans to install a giant moving mirror on a mountainside nearby. It’s supposed to reflect the rays from the winter sun, into the town!

An architect is now drawing up plans.

The Mayor believes that a motorised mirror about five metres wide could track the sun, always reflecting it into the town square. “On a clear day this would produce five hours of sunlight in the piazza even in mid-December,” he told the Beeb.

Now they just need about $130,000 dollars to build it.

Hey, if it works, I’d like a few in Chicago. We could use more sun. And we have a progressive Mayor, interesting in saving energy consumption. Mayor Daley, the Sun-King, I like it.

But I wonder, about Viganella, and other cities if they put up these moving mirrors these heliostats. How will light, at a time you’ve never had it, from a direction you’ve never had it, change things? How would human relations change? But also, how would the town physically change? Will they put up new shades? Punch windows in the north side of buildings? Will new buildings orient north?

But here’s my real question,
who is going to go up every morning
and

!,
-E

Everyone wants more light, even in the desert apparently.

Viganella story and top two graphics via the BBC .

12/22/2006

Italians need light
——-> how about a moving mirror in winter? Look at this –

Just north of Turin,



Now you thought Italians

knew everything about how to build a town, right?

Well Viganella was built at the bottom of a valley in the Alps.
Every year around November 11th the sun stops shining on this town, and it doesn’t come back until about February 2nd! In between, for all those weeks, no sunlight falls on this town. And you thought your winter was bad.

“It’s like Siberia,” one woman told the BBC – and this is Italy.

So after about 800 years of this, the mayor of Viganella plans to install a giant moving mirror on a mountainside nearby. It’s supposed to reflect the rays from the winter sun, into the town!

An architect is now drawing up plans.

The Mayor believes that a motorised mirror about five metres wide could track the sun, always reflecting it into the town square. “On a clear day this would produce five hours of sunlight in the piazza even in mid-December,” he told the Beeb.

Now they just need about $130,000 dollars to build it.

Hey, if it works, I’d like a few in Chicago. We could use more sun. And we have a progressive Mayor, interesting in saving energy consumption. Mayor Daley, the Sun-King, I like it.

But I wonder, about Viganella, and other cities if they put up these moving mirrors these heliostats. How will light, at a time you’ve never had it, from a direction you’ve never had it, change things? How would human relations change? But also, how would the town physically change? Will they put up new shades? Punch windows in the north side of buildings? Will new buildings orient north?

But here’s my real question,
who is going to go up every morning
and

!,
-E

Everyone wants more light, even in the desert apparently.

Viganella story and top two graphics via the BBC .

12/22/2006

Italians need light
——-> how about a moving mirror in winter? Look at this –

Just north of Turin,



Now you thought Italians

knew everything about how to build a town, right?

Well Viganella was built at the bottom of a valley in the Alps.
Every year around November 11th the sun stops shining on this town, and it doesn’t come back until about February 2nd! In between, for all those weeks, no sunlight falls on this town. And you thought your winter was bad.

“It’s like Siberia,” one woman told the BBC – and this is Italy.

So after about 800 years of this, the mayor of Viganella plans to install a giant moving mirror on a mountainside nearby. It’s supposed to reflect the rays from the winter sun, into the town!

An architect is now drawing up plans.

The Mayor believes that a motorised mirror about five metres wide could track the sun, always reflecting it into the town square. “On a clear day this would produce five hours of sunlight in the piazza even in mid-December,” he told the Beeb.

Now they just need about $130,000 dollars to build it.

Hey, if it works, I’d like a few in Chicago. We could use more sun. And we have a progressive Mayor, interesting in saving energy consumption. Mayor Daley, the Sun-King, I like it.

But I wonder, about Viganella, and other cities if they put up these moving mirrors these heliostats. How will light, at a time you’ve never had it, from a direction you’ve never had it, change things? How would human relations change? But also, how would the town physically change? Will they put up new shades? Punch windows in the north side of buildings? Will new buildings orient north?

But here’s my real question,
who is going to go up every morning
and

!,
-E

Everyone wants more light, even in the desert apparently.

Viganella story and top two graphics via the BBC .

12/15/2006

Calatrava Watch
Ire at the Spire

I used to give this thing about a
chance of being built,
but now I think it’s more

The leading civic organization in Streeterville slammed the revisions to architect Santiago Calatrava’s 2,000-foot-tall lakefront building Wednesday, adding political obstacles to the project’s immense economic challenges.” 12-14-06

Mr. C. has no luck in Chicago. Remember a few years back he was to design two pedestrian bridges over Lake Shore Drive between Buckingham Fountain and the lake? Those were squashed by the mayor.

And I’ve been wondering what Cala’s inspiration for this twisting tower might be, even though, everybody’s doin’ the dreaming and scheming. Zaha, SOM Ross Wimer, Ken, Y & S candies, and in Toronto, Moscow, and Bosnia, among other twists.

But I remember, in Calatrava’s homeland Spain, in many a cloister, seeing memorable

twisting columns, such as this one, at Burgos.

Of course my favorite is not in Spain, and not

in St. Peter’s, but rather, this beauty


in St. Severin in Paris.

-Edoardo

12/15/2006

Calatrava Watch
Ire at the Spire

I used to give this thing about a
chance of being built,
but now I think it’s more

The leading civic organization in Streeterville slammed the revisions to architect Santiago Calatrava’s 2,000-foot-tall lakefront building Wednesday, adding political obstacles to the project’s immense economic challenges.” 12-14-06

Mr. C. has no luck in Chicago. Remember a few years back he was to design two pedestrian bridges over Lake Shore Drive between Buckingham Fountain and the lake? Those were squashed by the mayor.

And I’ve been wondering what Cala’s inspiration for this twisting tower might be, even though, everybody’s doin’ the dreaming and scheming. Zaha, SOM Ross Wimer, Ken, Y & S candies, and in Toronto, Moscow, and Bosnia, among other twists.

But I remember, in Calatrava’s homeland Spain, in many a cloister, seeing memorable

twisting columns, such as this one, at Burgos.

Of course my favorite is not in Spain, and not

in St. Peter’s, but rather, this beauty


in St. Severin in Paris.

-Edoardo

11/29/2006

How Now Bruce Mau?
rumors and innuendo


Is it true Bruce Mau will move from Toronto to Chicago?

And/or open a branch here of his Institute Without Boundaries?

That’s the rumor floating around town. That he’ll help “Mr. Green Mayor” Mayor Daley to update Daniel Burnham’s famed Plan of Chicago for its centennial in 2009.

A few weeks ago Mau and “Massive Change” – his traveling exhibition now in Chicago on how design can save the world – placed an insert in the local run of the New York Times in which he praised Hizzoner Daley.

I wondered about it at the time. And I mentioned that the Mayor would give Mau a medal, at a “Global Visionaries Symposium.”

Well, it is true that our Jolly Green Mayor Daley is committed and passionate about sustainability.
Mr. Mau, come on down!

-Edward