Archive for the ‘Italia’ Category

12/22/2006

Italians need light
——-> how about a moving mirror in winter? Look at this –

Just north of Turin,



Now you thought Italians

knew everything about how to build a town, right?

Well Viganella was built at the bottom of a valley in the Alps.
Every year around November 11th the sun stops shining on this town, and it doesn’t come back until about February 2nd! In between, for all those weeks, no sunlight falls on this town. And you thought your winter was bad.

“It’s like Siberia,” one woman told the BBC – and this is Italy.

So after about 800 years of this, the mayor of Viganella plans to install a giant moving mirror on a mountainside nearby. It’s supposed to reflect the rays from the winter sun, into the town!

An architect is now drawing up plans.

The Mayor believes that a motorised mirror about five metres wide could track the sun, always reflecting it into the town square. “On a clear day this would produce five hours of sunlight in the piazza even in mid-December,” he told the Beeb.

Now they just need about $130,000 dollars to build it.

Hey, if it works, I’d like a few in Chicago. We could use more sun. And we have a progressive Mayor, interesting in saving energy consumption. Mayor Daley, the Sun-King, I like it.

But I wonder, about Viganella, and other cities if they put up these moving mirrors these heliostats. How will light, at a time you’ve never had it, from a direction you’ve never had it, change things? How would human relations change? But also, how would the town physically change? Will they put up new shades? Punch windows in the north side of buildings? Will new buildings orient north?

But here’s my real question,
who is going to go up every morning
and

!,
-E

Everyone wants more light, even in the desert apparently.

Viganella story and top two graphics via the BBC .

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12/22/2006

Italians need light
——-> how about a moving mirror in winter? Look at this –

Just north of Turin,



Now you thought Italians

knew everything about how to build a town, right?

Well Viganella was built at the bottom of a valley in the Alps.
Every year around November 11th the sun stops shining on this town, and it doesn’t come back until about February 2nd! In between, for all those weeks, no sunlight falls on this town. And you thought your winter was bad.

“It’s like Siberia,” one woman told the BBC – and this is Italy.

So after about 800 years of this, the mayor of Viganella plans to install a giant moving mirror on a mountainside nearby. It’s supposed to reflect the rays from the winter sun, into the town!

An architect is now drawing up plans.

The Mayor believes that a motorised mirror about five metres wide could track the sun, always reflecting it into the town square. “On a clear day this would produce five hours of sunlight in the piazza even in mid-December,” he told the Beeb.

Now they just need about $130,000 dollars to build it.

Hey, if it works, I’d like a few in Chicago. We could use more sun. And we have a progressive Mayor, interesting in saving energy consumption. Mayor Daley, the Sun-King, I like it.

But I wonder, about Viganella, and other cities if they put up these moving mirrors these heliostats. How will light, at a time you’ve never had it, from a direction you’ve never had it, change things? How would human relations change? But also, how would the town physically change? Will they put up new shades? Punch windows in the north side of buildings? Will new buildings orient north?

But here’s my real question,
who is going to go up every morning
and

!,
-E

Everyone wants more light, even in the desert apparently.

Viganella story and top two graphics via the BBC .

12/22/2006

Italians need light
——-> how about a moving mirror in winter? Look at this –

Just north of Turin,



Now you thought Italians

knew everything about how to build a town, right?

Well Viganella was built at the bottom of a valley in the Alps.
Every year around November 11th the sun stops shining on this town, and it doesn’t come back until about February 2nd! In between, for all those weeks, no sunlight falls on this town. And you thought your winter was bad.

“It’s like Siberia,” one woman told the BBC – and this is Italy.

So after about 800 years of this, the mayor of Viganella plans to install a giant moving mirror on a mountainside nearby. It’s supposed to reflect the rays from the winter sun, into the town!

An architect is now drawing up plans.

The Mayor believes that a motorised mirror about five metres wide could track the sun, always reflecting it into the town square. “On a clear day this would produce five hours of sunlight in the piazza even in mid-December,” he told the Beeb.

Now they just need about $130,000 dollars to build it.

Hey, if it works, I’d like a few in Chicago. We could use more sun. And we have a progressive Mayor, interesting in saving energy consumption. Mayor Daley, the Sun-King, I like it.

But I wonder, about Viganella, and other cities if they put up these moving mirrors these heliostats. How will light, at a time you’ve never had it, from a direction you’ve never had it, change things? How would human relations change? But also, how would the town physically change? Will they put up new shades? Punch windows in the north side of buildings? Will new buildings orient north?

But here’s my real question,
who is going to go up every morning
and

!,
-E

Everyone wants more light, even in the desert apparently.

Viganella story and top two graphics via the BBC .

12/16/2006

” …who was that mysterious tenor in full costume warming up in my dressing room when I came in Sunday night?”

I love this note-by-note of
il scandolo Alagna.

But can the writer really remember that many divine details of the performance?

Last Thursday, after boos from the La Scala crowd, Roberto Alagna walked off stage during his performance in Aida at La Scala. When the audience realized he was not coming back they shouted , “Vergogna! ” (shame) and “Buffone!” (fool!)

La Scala later served Alagna notice that he would not be invited back to complete the run.
So then,

“Alagna descended into full-fledged grassy knoll paranoia talking about mysterious threatening phone calls, unknown figures making karate chop motions in his direction as he entered the theater Sunday night, and other signs that the La Scala was conspiring to force him out. When that didn’t fly, he gave physical problems a whirl — my throat closed up, my blood sugar plummeted, why didn’t Chailly stop the performance to check on me?; that’s what Muti did when Domingo nearly fainted in ‘Otello’ — they could wait an hour for Domingo and not a few minutes for me?, and who was that mysterious tenor in full costume warming up in my dressing room when I came in Sunday night?”

Now Corriere reports that Thursday evening, since he had been replaced onstage, Alagna took to the piazza in front of the opera house to stage his own ‘one-man show’ in piazza!

“Presenting himself a few minutes before the beginning of the performance inside of Aida, Alagna began to sing his part, surrounded by curious onlookers and photographers.

Then, looking at il Teatro La Scala, he sang a passage from Puccini’s Madame Butterfly
«Addio fiorito asil, di letizia e d’amore»
.
Goodbye flowered exile, of joy and love!


Then with his cell phone, he snapped a photo of the theater. ‘I came to have a reminder, my last happy memory of la Scala, since I don’t know when I’ll be able to see her again.'”

Ah Italia!
Wish I’d been there. You know I like piazza life.
Sunday eve I did pass through Chicago’s Piazza San Giovanni. A few drunk guys were singing about football….

-E

Alagna story via.

12/16/2006

” …who was that mysterious tenor in full costume warming up in my dressing room when I came in Sunday night?”

I love this note-by-note of
il scandolo Alagna.

But can the writer really remember that many divine details of the performance?

Last Thursday, after boos from the La Scala crowd, Roberto Alagna walked off stage during his performance in Aida at La Scala. When the audience realized he was not coming back they shouted , “Vergogna! ” (shame) and “Buffone!” (fool!)

La Scala later served Alagna notice that he would not be invited back to complete the run.
So then,

“Alagna descended into full-fledged grassy knoll paranoia talking about mysterious threatening phone calls, unknown figures making karate chop motions in his direction as he entered the theater Sunday night, and other signs that the La Scala was conspiring to force him out. When that didn’t fly, he gave physical problems a whirl — my throat closed up, my blood sugar plummeted, why didn’t Chailly stop the performance to check on me?; that’s what Muti did when Domingo nearly fainted in ‘Otello’ — they could wait an hour for Domingo and not a few minutes for me?, and who was that mysterious tenor in full costume warming up in my dressing room when I came in Sunday night?”

Now Corriere reports that Thursday evening, since he had been replaced onstage, Alagna took to the piazza in front of the opera house to stage his own ‘one-man show’ in piazza!

“Presenting himself a few minutes before the beginning of the performance inside of Aida, Alagna began to sing his part, surrounded by curious onlookers and photographers.

Then, looking at il Teatro La Scala, he sang a passage from Puccini’s Madame Butterfly
«Addio fiorito asil, di letizia e d’amore»
.
Goodbye flowered exile, of joy and love!


Then with his cell phone, he snapped a photo of the theater. ‘I came to have a reminder, my last happy memory of la Scala, since I don’t know when I’ll be able to see her again.'”

Ah Italia!
Wish I’d been there. You know I like piazza life.
Sunday eve I did pass through Chicago’s Piazza San Giovanni. A few drunk guys were singing about football….

-E

Alagna story via.

12/05/2006

Cos’e’ (What is it?)

Speaking of train stations, I love

Florence Train Station

not for its architecture,
but for its urbanism. You arrive, you’re right in the city. You step out of the train station, Firenze is at your feet. Time for

then it’s time to say hello to a great introduction to the magical city


Santa Maria Novella – right by the station.

Go inside,

the interior looks like

swirling espresso foam.

There was great espresso when I lived in Firenze for a number of years. but there was no airport and no high-speed rail. It felt more like a large Italian village than it does today.
Did you know that by 2008 Firenze will have a new high-speed train station?

The Florence RFI Station will provide an important link on Italy’s high-speed network currently being built between Turin and Venice in the north and Naples in the south. The station, to be predominantly underground, will be situated a short distance from the existing station just outside Florence’s historic city centre.


High-speed trains are better than planes I say. Sir Norman Foster and partners designed the high-speed rail station. Click here, for wonderful renderings showing light, and shadows and… concrete? No! Green and white marble. Fabulous. Money well-spent, Italia. Foster’s office says

“…the scheme is both a celebration of the experience of entry into Florence and an attempt to reduce the complexities of modern travel.

The composition is capped by an arching glazed roof, which evokes the great railway structures of the nineteenth century. Arriving in the station, the generous volume, with natural light flooding in from above, gives an immediate sense of space and light; one can see the sky and sense the air of the city.

The scheme is designed to ensure durability and ease of maintenance, to minimise energy consumption and reduce running costs. Natural light is a crucial part of this equation, so too is temperature control. … It also incorporates photovoltaic cells to generate power. The walls and floors are lined with a palette of rich materials familiar throughout the city – including a highly figured green and white marble – which will patinate gracefully over time.”


Fabulous.

The rendering at the top – that’s it. Looks appropriate to me. In the Florentine tradition of great design, no? This is Florence. A city of humanism.

– Eduardo

12/05/2006

Cos’e’ (What is it?)

Speaking of train stations, I love

Florence Train Station

not for its architecture,
but for its urbanism. You arrive, you’re right in the city. You step out of the train station, Firenze is at your feet. Time for

then it’s time to say hello to a great introduction to the magical city


Santa Maria Novella – right by the station.

Go inside,

the interior looks like

swirling espresso foam.

There was great espresso when I lived in Firenze for a number of years. but there was no airport and no high-speed rail. It felt more like a large Italian village than it does today.
Did you know that by 2008 Firenze will have a new high-speed train station?

The Florence RFI Station will provide an important link on Italy’s high-speed network currently being built between Turin and Venice in the north and Naples in the south. The station, to be predominantly underground, will be situated a short distance from the existing station just outside Florence’s historic city centre.


High-speed trains are better than planes I say. Sir Norman Foster and partners designed the high-speed rail station. Click here, for wonderful renderings showing light, and shadows and… concrete? No! Green and white marble. Fabulous. Money well-spent, Italia. Foster’s office says

“…the scheme is both a celebration of the experience of entry into Florence and an attempt to reduce the complexities of modern travel.

The composition is capped by an arching glazed roof, which evokes the great railway structures of the nineteenth century. Arriving in the station, the generous volume, with natural light flooding in from above, gives an immediate sense of space and light; one can see the sky and sense the air of the city.

The scheme is designed to ensure durability and ease of maintenance, to minimise energy consumption and reduce running costs. Natural light is a crucial part of this equation, so too is temperature control. … It also incorporates photovoltaic cells to generate power. The walls and floors are lined with a palette of rich materials familiar throughout the city – including a highly figured green and white marble – which will patinate gracefully over time.”


Fabulous.

The rendering at the top – that’s it. Looks appropriate to me. In the Florentine tradition of great design, no? This is Florence. A city of humanism.

– Eduardo

12/05/2006

Cos’e’ (What is it?)

Speaking of train stations, I love

Florence Train Station

not for its architecture,
but for its urbanism. You arrive, you’re right in the city. You step out of the train station, Firenze is at your feet. Time for

then it’s time to say hello to a great introduction to the magical city


Santa Maria Novella – right by the station.

Go inside,

the interior looks like

swirling espresso foam.

There was great espresso when I lived in Firenze for a number of years. but there was no airport and no high-speed rail. It felt more like a large Italian village than it does today.
Did you know that by 2008 Firenze will have a new high-speed train station?

The Florence RFI Station will provide an important link on Italy’s high-speed network currently being built between Turin and Venice in the north and Naples in the south. The station, to be predominantly underground, will be situated a short distance from the existing station just outside Florence’s historic city centre.


High-speed trains are better than planes I say. Sir Norman Foster and partners designed the high-speed rail station. Click here, for wonderful renderings showing light, and shadows and… concrete? No! Green and white marble. Fabulous. Money well-spent, Italia. Foster’s office says

“…the scheme is both a celebration of the experience of entry into Florence and an attempt to reduce the complexities of modern travel.

The composition is capped by an arching glazed roof, which evokes the great railway structures of the nineteenth century. Arriving in the station, the generous volume, with natural light flooding in from above, gives an immediate sense of space and light; one can see the sky and sense the air of the city.

The scheme is designed to ensure durability and ease of maintenance, to minimise energy consumption and reduce running costs. Natural light is a crucial part of this equation, so too is temperature control. … It also incorporates photovoltaic cells to generate power. The walls and floors are lined with a palette of rich materials familiar throughout the city – including a highly figured green and white marble – which will patinate gracefully over time.”


Fabulous.

The rendering at the top – that’s it. Looks appropriate to me. In the Florentine tradition of great design, no? This is Florence. A city of humanism.

– Eduardo