Archive for the ‘Jerusalem’ Category

Trains, cranes and museums

11/18/2008

Tyler Green says of Jeff Koons’ project for outside LACMA, the L.A. County Museum of Art,


“This is unrelated to the proposed Koons ‘train’ at LACMA, but what the heck…


I like that “rhyme” and wish I’d thought of it (after all, Montparnasse, where this occurred, was my train station when I lived in Paris and that image was all around)

but Koon’s project to me has always “rhymed with”


Moshe Safdie’s design (unbuilt) for the Stuttgart Museum of Contemporary Art (1990).

Unlike Koon’s proposal, Safdie’s had a practical function

“Served by a giant crane, the temporary galleries could be moved and transferred to off-site storage when not in use…. When not being used, the crane would stand motionless like a spire, but would appear to transform itself into a symbol of change while in use, as it swung to position new works or convert temporary galleries for upcoming exhibitions.”


And unlike L.A., Stuttgart does not suffer earthquakes, that I know of.

And although it’s very different in tone, reason and purpose – while we’re talking Moshe Safdie, let’s remember, with respect, that a little later, around 1991 – 1994, he designed the Yad Vashem Transports Memorial.



(Click on either catalog image to enlarge it.)
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01/26/2007

Do you like Orange?
Rudolf Stingel
at Chicago’s Museum of Contemporary Art;
later going to the Whitney.

Stingel covered the main foyer with silvery insulation, added a gaudy chandelier and a cornice on top to make the room more classically proportioned.

It’s amazing how this kunsthalle can change its atmosphere so thoroughly. It makes it thrilling to return often. With each incarnation you layer the memories in your mind; and your relationship to the space deepens. As when you watch a child grow through phases.

In the first gallery on the left,

enter – a ‘color field’ room.

You might think you don’t like orange carpet, but this room warms the heart, feels very still and quiet and comfortable. People will lie down in here and calmness will reign!

It’s nice to see a room not filled with ‘things’. Especially in a museum.

On those walls covered with

shiny metallic film

people are invited to scrawl,


This began unintentionally at a previous Stingel show elsewhere. But is this the first time museum goers embed objects in a Stingel wall?

The least successful room holds a very large and very foreshortened self-portrait.


If you still think you don’t like orange, there’s another gallery with a white carpet. This one is on the wall. And people write in it with their finger.


Reminded me somehow of the wall in Jerusalem. People put notes in that too. But would that make this religious somehow? Well, it is. See the next two posts. And all good art is.

And that orange, it’s like a beautiful g-dgiven sunset.

-Edwardo

01/26/2007

Do you like Orange?
Rudolf Stingel
at Chicago’s Museum of Contemporary Art;
later going to the Whitney.

Stingel covered the main foyer with silvery insulation, added a gaudy chandelier and a cornice on top to make the room more classically proportioned.

It’s amazing how this kunsthalle can change its atmosphere so thoroughly. It makes it thrilling to return often. With each incarnation you layer the memories in your mind; and your relationship to the space deepens. As when you watch a child grow through phases.

In the first gallery on the left,

enter – a ‘color field’ room.

You might think you don’t like orange carpet, but this room warms the heart, feels very still and quiet and comfortable. People will lie down in here and calmness will reign!

It’s nice to see a room not filled with ‘things’. Especially in a museum.

On those walls covered with

shiny metallic film

people are invited to scrawl,


This began unintentionally at a previous Stingel show elsewhere. But is this the first time museum goers embed objects in a Stingel wall?

The least successful room holds a very large and very foreshortened self-portrait.


If you still think you don’t like orange, there’s another gallery with a white carpet. This one is on the wall. And people write in it with their finger.


Reminded me somehow of the wall in Jerusalem. People put notes in that too. But would that make this religious somehow? Well, it is. See the next two posts. And all good art is.

And that orange, it’s like a beautiful g-dgiven sunset.

-Edwardo

01/26/2007

Do you like Orange?
Rudolf Stingel
at Chicago’s Museum of Contemporary Art;
later going to the Whitney.

Stingel covered the main foyer with silvery insulation, added a gaudy chandelier and a cornice on top to make the room more classically proportioned.

It’s amazing how this kunsthalle can change its atmosphere so thoroughly. It makes it thrilling to return often. With each incarnation you layer the memories in your mind; and your relationship to the space deepens. As when you watch a child grow through phases.

In the first gallery on the left,

enter – a ‘color field’ room.

You might think you don’t like orange carpet, but this room warms the heart, feels very still and quiet and comfortable. People will lie down in here and calmness will reign!

It’s nice to see a room not filled with ‘things’. Especially in a museum.

On those walls covered with

shiny metallic film

people are invited to scrawl,


This began unintentionally at a previous Stingel show elsewhere. But is this the first time museum goers embed objects in a Stingel wall?

The least successful room holds a very large and very foreshortened self-portrait.


If you still think you don’t like orange, there’s another gallery with a white carpet. This one is on the wall. And people write in it with their finger.


Reminded me somehow of the wall in Jerusalem. People put notes in that too. But would that make this religious somehow? Well, it is. See the next two posts. And all good art is.

And that orange, it’s like a beautiful g-dgiven sunset.

-Edwardo