Archive for the ‘Libeskind’ Category

Which is not by Daniel Libeskind?

05/10/2008

Top – Royal Ontario Museum Chandelier, Toronto, Canada. Designed by Daniel Libeskind and donated by Swarovski, the Spirit House Chandelier will be installed on the staircase between the Level 4 Institute for Contemporary Culture Gallery and the Level 5 Crystal Five Restaurant Lounge.

Bottom – The “Swimming Around In Circles” aquarium by Design Studio Forever.


images via C-Monster

More info and pix of Libeskind’s Royal Ontario Museum



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02/21/2007



Architects and Music

More since the last post.

Rafael Vinoly, who is now designing an opera for Chicago, and in the past designed the Kimmel Center where the Philadelphia orchestra plays, and he designed Jazz at Lincoln Center at Columbus Circle in New York, trained for a career as a pianist. His father ran the Teatro Colón in Argentina. I’m supposed to interview Vinoly soon, and I’ll ask him the role music plays a role in his design of spaces. As one who works a lot with words I’m interested in the essentially wordless artforms of architecture and music. Of course words have space and music to them too.

Daniel Libeskind, whom I mentioned also designed opera, also trained and performed as a professional pianist. He told me, as we walked through his Jewish Museum in Berlin together, that music is part of that architecture, and that he was conscious of designing spaces that would have a certain acoustic, a certain “sound” to them, even when “empty” or “void.” And then of course, they resonate when sound is created within.

I wonder about other close relationships between architects and music?

02/21/2007



Architects and Music

More since the last post.

Rafael Vinoly, who is now designing an opera for Chicago, and in the past designed the Kimmel Center where the Philadelphia orchestra plays, and he designed Jazz at Lincoln Center at Columbus Circle in New York, trained for a career as a pianist. His father ran the Teatro Colón in Argentina. I’m supposed to interview Vinoly soon, and I’ll ask him the role music plays a role in his design of spaces. As one who works a lot with words I’m interested in the essentially wordless artforms of architecture and music. Of course words have space and music to them too.

Daniel Libeskind, whom I mentioned also designed opera, also trained and performed as a professional pianist. He told me, as we walked through his Jewish Museum in Berlin together, that music is part of that architecture, and that he was conscious of designing spaces that would have a certain acoustic, a certain “sound” to them, even when “empty” or “void.” And then of course, they resonate when sound is created within.

I wonder about other close relationships between architects and music?

02/20/2007


Rafael! The Return of Vi
ñoly

Starchitect Rafael Viñoly has designed a production of Monteverdi’s The Return of Ulysses. It will open March 28th at Chicago Opera Theater.

COT’s marketing department writes, “His flair for breathtaking drama shows in his buildings…. Now the renowned architect Rafael Viñoly unleashes his creativity on Homer’s story of Ulysses.”

Vinoly returns to Daleyville, after his much-praised

Graduate School of Business at the University of Chicago (across the street from Frank Lloyd Wright’s Robie House.) Vinoly is also working on a hospital building for the University of Chicago, scheduled to open in 2011. It’ll feature a “Sky Garden” with broad views of Washington Park and the University of Chicago campus.

I’m always interested in the confluence of Architecture and Music. In fact, I’ll be talking about it at Frank Lloyd Wright’s Unity Temple on March 31, in a benefit for the Unity Temple Restoration Foundation.

I’m looking forward to seeing Vinoly’s Ulysses three days earlier. A happy coincidence .
Architects and Opera? In 2002 I saw

Daniel Libeskind’s Saint Francis of Assisi (Messian) at the Deutsche Oper Berlin. I found that a little too mechanistic in design and movement, and less revealing or supportive of the music.

I’m curious to see what Vinoly will do. His
Kimmel Center for the Performing Arts in Philadelphia is musical architecture.

Chicago Opera Theater run by Brian (“[I managed to catch Vinoly] for a moment during his crazy schedule of zooming around the world as architects do these days,”) Dickie, with Jane Glover conducting, is one of the top cultural organizations here. Their Nixon in China last year was unforgettably, mind-blowingly searingly good culture. They brought out the drama in that repetitive work by John Adams with superb singing, staging and many tv sets in a line across the stage. They made the normally pallid Harris Theater stage sing. Their contemporary staging worked well in that simple straightforward space.

Of course, the most symbiotic relationship would be between


Tosca and the church in Rome in which it opens,

Sant’Andrea della Valle.
Try walking into there and not hearing music!

St. Francis photo © Bernd Uhlig

02/20/2007


Rafael! The Return of Vi
ñoly

Starchitect Rafael Viñoly has designed a production of Monteverdi’s The Return of Ulysses. It will open March 28th at Chicago Opera Theater.

COT’s marketing department writes, “His flair for breathtaking drama shows in his buildings…. Now the renowned architect Rafael Viñoly unleashes his creativity on Homer’s story of Ulysses.”

Vinoly returns to Daleyville, after his much-praised

Graduate School of Business at the University of Chicago (across the street from Frank Lloyd Wright’s Robie House.) Vinoly is also working on a hospital building for the University of Chicago, scheduled to open in 2011. It’ll feature a “Sky Garden” with broad views of Washington Park and the University of Chicago campus.

I’m always interested in the confluence of Architecture and Music. In fact, I’ll be talking about it at Frank Lloyd Wright’s Unity Temple on March 31, in a benefit for the Unity Temple Restoration Foundation.

I’m looking forward to seeing Vinoly’s Ulysses three days earlier. A happy coincidence .
Architects and Opera? In 2002 I saw

Daniel Libeskind’s Saint Francis of Assisi (Messian) at the Deutsche Oper Berlin. I found that a little too mechanistic in design and movement, and less revealing or supportive of the music.

I’m curious to see what Vinoly will do. His
Kimmel Center for the Performing Arts in Philadelphia is musical architecture.

Chicago Opera Theater run by Brian (“[I managed to catch Vinoly] for a moment during his crazy schedule of zooming around the world as architects do these days,”) Dickie, with Jane Glover conducting, is one of the top cultural organizations here. Their Nixon in China last year was unforgettably, mind-blowingly searingly good culture. They brought out the drama in that repetitive work by John Adams with superb singing, staging and many tv sets in a line across the stage. They made the normally pallid Harris Theater stage sing. Their contemporary staging worked well in that simple straightforward space.

Of course, the most symbiotic relationship would be between


Tosca and the church in Rome in which it opens,

Sant’Andrea della Valle.
Try walking into there and not hearing music!

St. Francis photo © Bernd Uhlig

01/24/2007

I’ve been enjoying Richard Lacayo’s new blog. He likens

Walter Gropius’ The Monument to the March Dead, (1922) to


The Sea of Ice (1824) by another German, Caspar David Friedrich.

I find that’s brilliant. But I find it also reminds me of something else.

Daniel Libeskind’s addition to the Denver Art Museum (2006).

Libeskind lived in Germany too.

01/24/2007

I’ve been enjoying Richard Lacayo’s new blog. He likens

Walter Gropius’ The Monument to the March Dead, (1922) to


The Sea of Ice (1824) by another German, Caspar David Friedrich.

I find that’s brilliant. But I find it also reminds me of something else.

Daniel Libeskind’s addition to the Denver Art Museum (2006).

Libeskind lived in Germany too.

01/24/2007

I’ve been enjoying Richard Lacayo’s new blog. He likens

Walter Gropius’ The Monument to the March Dead, (1922) to


The Sea of Ice (1824) by another German, Caspar David Friedrich.

I find that’s brilliant. But I find it also reminds me of something else.

Daniel Libeskind’s addition to the Denver Art Museum (2006).

Libeskind lived in Germany too.

12/12/2006

Was your friend named Osama?

From the website of
Sean Kenney – the first of only four LEGO Certified Professionals:

“My Lego World Trade Center was built before the terrorist attacks. It was 5.5 feet tall, and contained over 12,500 pieces.

It was accidentally knocked over by a friend.”

Kenny creates LEGO art full-time. I’m serious! That’s crazier than blogging.


Look where that’ll get you.

A meeting with Daniel Libeskind. And is that Kong on the red, white and blue Empire State Building or is that an architect saying, ‘I won’t come down until you build my Freedom Tower.” ?

-E

12/12/2006

Was your friend named Osama?

From the website of
Sean Kenney – the first of only four LEGO Certified Professionals:

“My Lego World Trade Center was built before the terrorist attacks. It was 5.5 feet tall, and contained over 12,500 pieces.

It was accidentally knocked over by a friend.”

Kenny creates LEGO art full-time. I’m serious! That’s crazier than blogging.


Look where that’ll get you.

A meeting with Daniel Libeskind. And is that Kong on the red, white and blue Empire State Building or is that an architect saying, ‘I won’t come down until you build my Freedom Tower.” ?

-E