Archive for the ‘Light’ Category

11/19/2007

The Light of Mies
over a 24 hour period. As seen via computer in a model with one million polygons. Looks real to me!

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Freeway stripes on the floor of L.A.’s cathedral?!

05/30/2007

L.A.’s about the light.

Moneo’s Cathedral can be luminous/numinous.

Take one adobe church,


add Ronchamp by Corbusier,


and you get Rafael Moneo’s pretty wonderful modernist cathedral in L.A.
But the light on the floor can look like freeway stripes, no?


-E

Freeway to heaven?

02/05/2007

A girl’s best friend.

No I’m not in Egypt, or even Paris, and no I’m not with my arms around a lover. But where I am I did stumble on this article on the night lights of Paris.

Money grafs:

And there are even two separate “schools” when it comes to the science (or is it art?) of lighting the city’s public buildings. There is the Paris school, a holistic approach that bathes a structure in a warm, even glow. The Conciergerie, the one-time medieval prison on the Île de la Cité, and Palais Garnier, the extravagant 19th-century opera house, are lighted this way.

Then there is the Lyon school, a pointillist approach that uses small spotlights to highlight the elaborate decorations and details of buildings for more drama. The balconies and niches of the Hôtel de Ville, Paris’s City Hall, and the Pont Alexandre-III, with its candelabras, cupids, sea monsters and other elaborate decorations, are lighted in the Lyon style.

Which do you prefer? I love the Paris school. The golden orange light, like liquid stone, seems to begin as spirit, white light, in the pure heart and core of the building, then as it passes through the stone it takes on a golden orange hue with which it penetrates us.

The Lyon school is more dramatic, more immediate satisfaction.

Que pensez-vous? What do you think?

And in the states we tend to throw light onto the buildings, rather than figuring out how to light them from the inside out. We’re getting better though. The arches on the facades of Chicago’s Art Institute are now beautifully lit. Paris school – style.

And of course modern, glass buildings get designed with lights, often colorful LEDs, inside the walls, the floors etc.
Helmut Jahn, Potsdamer Platz, Berlin. Crystalline.

And see how Pei’s pyramid – reflected in the water – confirms it…


How does Marilyn sing it?….

“The French were bred to die for love…. “

-Edouard

02/05/2007

A girl’s best friend.

No I’m not in Egypt, or even Paris, and no I’m not with my arms around a lover. But where I am I did stumble on this article on the night lights of Paris.

Money grafs:

And there are even two separate “schools” when it comes to the science (or is it art?) of lighting the city’s public buildings. There is the Paris school, a holistic approach that bathes a structure in a warm, even glow. The Conciergerie, the one-time medieval prison on the Île de la Cité, and Palais Garnier, the extravagant 19th-century opera house, are lighted this way.

Then there is the Lyon school, a pointillist approach that uses small spotlights to highlight the elaborate decorations and details of buildings for more drama. The balconies and niches of the Hôtel de Ville, Paris’s City Hall, and the Pont Alexandre-III, with its candelabras, cupids, sea monsters and other elaborate decorations, are lighted in the Lyon style.

Which do you prefer? I love the Paris school. The golden orange light, like liquid stone, seems to begin as spirit, white light, in the pure heart and core of the building, then as it passes through the stone it takes on a golden orange hue with which it penetrates us.

The Lyon school is more dramatic, more immediate satisfaction.

Que pensez-vous? What do you think?

And in the states we tend to throw light onto the buildings, rather than figuring out how to light them from the inside out. We’re getting better though. The arches on the facades of Chicago’s Art Institute are now beautifully lit. Paris school – style.

And of course modern, glass buildings get designed with lights, often colorful LEDs, inside the walls, the floors etc.
Helmut Jahn, Potsdamer Platz, Berlin. Crystalline.

And see how Pei’s pyramid – reflected in the water – confirms it…


How does Marilyn sing it?….

“The French were bred to die for love…. “

-Edouard

01/26/2007

Return to the Jazz Age?

On my way to the Art Institute last night, to see the winners of this year’s Chicago Prize, and for the lecture by Marion Weiss – of recent Olympic Sculpture Park in Seattle fame, (more on both events later) I looked up, as I always do, and saw


One South Dearborn by Jim DeStefano, Rick Keating and Partners, beaming the colors of the Super Bowl – bound Chicago Bears over the stately Michigan Avenue streetwall. Even if you don’t know what they’re for, the colors spread cheer on a cold winter night.
-E

01/26/2007

Return to the Jazz Age?

On my way to the Art Institute last night, to see the winners of this year’s Chicago Prize, and for the lecture by Marion Weiss – of recent Olympic Sculpture Park in Seattle fame, (more on both events later) I looked up, as I always do, and saw


One South Dearborn by Jim DeStefano, Rick Keating and Partners, beaming the colors of the Super Bowl – bound Chicago Bears over the stately Michigan Avenue streetwall. Even if you don’t know what they’re for, the colors spread cheer on a cold winter night.
-E

01/26/2007

Return to the Jazz Age?

On my way to the Art Institute last night, to see the winners of this year’s Chicago Prize, and for the lecture by Marion Weiss – of recent Olympic Sculpture Park in Seattle fame, (more on both events later) I looked up, as I always do, and saw


One South Dearborn by Jim DeStefano, Rick Keating and Partners, beaming the colors of the Super Bowl – bound Chicago Bears over the stately Michigan Avenue streetwall. Even if you don’t know what they’re for, the colors spread cheer on a cold winter night.
-E

12/31/2006


Architecture is a marriage of the functional and the spritual, if the spaces we create do not move the heart and mind then they are surely only addressing one part of their function. Light is a good example. Any engineer can quantify the lumens required to brighten a passage or to read a book. But what about the poetic dimension of natural light: the changing nature of an overcast sky, the discovery of dappled shade, the intensity of a sunburst.”

-Norman Foster, from “Reflections.”

Sir Norman’s “personal statement about architecture, how it is understood and how it is perceived.” For Foster, the book reflects his belief that architecture is essentially a social art; a necessity and not a luxury; that it is generated by people’s needs, which are both spiritual and material. It has much to do with optimism, joy, and reassurance-of order in a disordered world, of privacy in the midst of many, of space in a crowded site, of light on a dull day. It is about quality – the quality of the space and the poetry of the light that models it.”

Thought I’d leave you with that, as we make disorder tonight.
Next year, perhaps we’ll return to order. We shall try.

If you’re in Chicago, today’s the last day for Bruce Mau’s exhibition, Massive Change at the Museum of Contemporary Art. Open until 5pm.

Hope to see you in ’07!
Happy, Healthy New Year to you and yours,
-Edward

12/31/2006


Architecture is a marriage of the functional and the spritual, if the spaces we create do not move the heart and mind then they are surely only addressing one part of their function. Light is a good example. Any engineer can quantify the lumens required to brighten a passage or to read a book. But what about the poetic dimension of natural light: the changing nature of an overcast sky, the discovery of dappled shade, the intensity of a sunburst.”

-Norman Foster, from “Reflections.”

Sir Norman’s “personal statement about architecture, how it is understood and how it is perceived.” For Foster, the book reflects his belief that architecture is essentially a social art; a necessity and not a luxury; that it is generated by people’s needs, which are both spiritual and material. It has much to do with optimism, joy, and reassurance-of order in a disordered world, of privacy in the midst of many, of space in a crowded site, of light on a dull day. It is about quality – the quality of the space and the poetry of the light that models it.”

Thought I’d leave you with that, as we make disorder tonight.
Next year, perhaps we’ll return to order. We shall try.

If you’re in Chicago, today’s the last day for Bruce Mau’s exhibition, Massive Change at the Museum of Contemporary Art. Open until 5pm.

Hope to see you in ’07!
Happy, Healthy New Year to you and yours,
-Edward

12/31/2006


Architecture is a marriage of the functional and the spritual, if the spaces we create do not move the heart and mind then they are surely only addressing one part of their function. Light is a good example. Any engineer can quantify the lumens required to brighten a passage or to read a book. But what about the poetic dimension of natural light: the changing nature of an overcast sky, the discovery of dappled shade, the intensity of a sunburst.”

-Norman Foster, from “Reflections.”

Sir Norman’s “personal statement about architecture, how it is understood and how it is perceived.” For Foster, the book reflects his belief that architecture is essentially a social art; a necessity and not a luxury; that it is generated by people’s needs, which are both spiritual and material. It has much to do with optimism, joy, and reassurance-of order in a disordered world, of privacy in the midst of many, of space in a crowded site, of light on a dull day. It is about quality – the quality of the space and the poetry of the light that models it.”

Thought I’d leave you with that, as we make disorder tonight.
Next year, perhaps we’ll return to order. We shall try.

If you’re in Chicago, today’s the last day for Bruce Mau’s exhibition, Massive Change at the Museum of Contemporary Art. Open until 5pm.

Hope to see you in ’07!
Happy, Healthy New Year to you and yours,
-Edward