Archive for the ‘marketing’ Category

01/23/2007

Me, Me, Me, Me, Mies

Myron on Mies and marketing: (from Myron Goldsmith’s oral history)

Mies was not one to seek publicity, to approach anybody aggressively. I’m sure he turned down a lot of things that he did not consider worthy. There was not the kind of aggressive publicity-seeking that you have now (1986) of architects wheeling and dealing. The word marketing, which has become such a well-used word in the architectural profession didn’t apply then.

He had this idea, and I think he instilled it in everything, that it was terribly important that everything that was being done was to be done in the best way, the most serious way and the most professional way. I think in all his public dealings, in a speech to, say, the faculty wives, he would spend weeks on it because he was making a statement. I think if he wrote a letter, other than a routine letter, it was very well thought out.

You can see that to a man who thinks like that, that architecture is a kind of holy profession, that he’s the heir to the medieval builders where even a statue at the top of the cathedral they would finish as if it were on the ground.

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01/23/2007

Me, Me, Me, Me, Mies

Myron on Mies and marketing: (from Myron Goldsmith’s oral history)

Mies was not one to seek publicity, to approach anybody aggressively. I’m sure he turned down a lot of things that he did not consider worthy. There was not the kind of aggressive publicity-seeking that you have now (1986) of architects wheeling and dealing. The word marketing, which has become such a well-used word in the architectural profession didn’t apply then.

He had this idea, and I think he instilled it in everything, that it was terribly important that everything that was being done was to be done in the best way, the most serious way and the most professional way. I think in all his public dealings, in a speech to, say, the faculty wives, he would spend weeks on it because he was making a statement. I think if he wrote a letter, other than a routine letter, it was very well thought out.

You can see that to a man who thinks like that, that architecture is a kind of holy profession, that he’s the heir to the medieval builders where even a statue at the top of the cathedral they would finish as if it were on the ground.

01/23/2007

Me, Me, Me, Me, Mies

Myron on Mies and marketing: (from Myron Goldsmith’s oral history)

Mies was not one to seek publicity, to approach anybody aggressively. I’m sure he turned down a lot of things that he did not consider worthy. There was not the kind of aggressive publicity-seeking that you have now (1986) of architects wheeling and dealing. The word marketing, which has become such a well-used word in the architectural profession didn’t apply then.

He had this idea, and I think he instilled it in everything, that it was terribly important that everything that was being done was to be done in the best way, the most serious way and the most professional way. I think in all his public dealings, in a speech to, say, the faculty wives, he would spend weeks on it because he was making a statement. I think if he wrote a letter, other than a routine letter, it was very well thought out.

You can see that to a man who thinks like that, that architecture is a kind of holy profession, that he’s the heir to the medieval builders where even a statue at the top of the cathedral they would finish as if it were on the ground.

11/13/2006

The logo for Chicago’s Olympics bid. Nice. Glad the flame is really buildings. The buildings in the logo kind of look like the Sears Tower, but not really. Wouldn’t it be nicer if it showed specific buildings from our storied inventory?

It’s supposed to show “the vitality of a city that rose from the ashes.” But I think fire and Chicago buildings don’t mix. Ask Louis Sullivan.


The green in the logo is for our efforts at sustainability and our parks and the blue is for Lake Michigan. The logo was designed by VSA partners. You’ve seen other work of theirs, for example if you’ve been to Chicago Children’s Theater.

11/13/2006

The logo for Chicago’s Olympics bid. Nice. Glad the flame is really buildings. The buildings in the logo kind of look like the Sears Tower, but not really. Wouldn’t it be nicer if it showed specific buildings from our storied inventory?

It’s supposed to show “the vitality of a city that rose from the ashes.” But I think fire and Chicago buildings don’t mix. Ask Louis Sullivan.


The green in the logo is for our efforts at sustainability and our parks and the blue is for Lake Michigan. The logo was designed by VSA partners. You’ve seen other work of theirs, for example if you’ve been to Chicago Children’s Theater.