Archive for the ‘Massive Change’ Category

05/19/2007

Bruce Mau told me last night,

at the superbly fun benefit for Stanley Tigerman and Eva Maddox’s Archeworks,

that he is moving with his family to Chicago in July. He’ll open a school called
“The Institute for Massive Change.”

He’ll put it in Louis Sullivan’s inspiring department store building on State Street. Carson’s – the store in there for decades, recently vacated. Mau’s school will be in the same building as, and he will team up with Tony Jones and The School of the Art Institute of Chicago, which recently began teaching architecture on the top floors of the Sullivan masterpiece.

Bruce Mau said he intends to focus his activities on cities. He plans to develop “Chicago prototypes.” He hopes city planners and leaders around the world will note his achievements here, come here to study them, and then replicate them where needed. He told me that a developer working on a project in Korea wants to fund the prototype here, and if or when it’s successful, replicate the solution in Korea. I have no more details on that.

Mau will live on Chicago’s North Shore; he’s looking for a grand old house to turn “smart.” With all the visitors he expects he joked it’ll be something of an “eco-resort.” Tell that to the good ladies of Winnetka.

How did this come about? Bruce Mau said that he was gratified by the welcome he received in Chicago when he brought his exhibtion “Massive Change” to the Museum of Contemporary Art. He had lunch with Stanley Tigerman. Tigerman asked him, “What are you doing? Why aren’t you here?” Tigerman told Mau he could accomplish in ten years in Chicago what it would take him forty years to acheive in Toronto. Next thing you know, Mau’s moving his family to Chi-town and opening a school here.

Bruce Mau says he’s a big fan of Mayor Daley and the work he’s doing to make Chicago more “green.” Daley is also a fan of Mau and his work.

Finally, Bruce Mau says it’s too late to tone down the expectations people have for him, but that he’ll work here to realize his dreams here.

The “City of Broad Shoulders,” “the City that Works;” the city of “Make no Little Plans,” and “Build, Don’t Talk,” welcomes its latest big thinker. I’m so glad to see him come here and help spur the Chicago Renaissance.

Remember, Chicago’s motto has always been, “Urbs in Horto” – “City in a garden.”

Welcome Bruce Mau and family. Make the place grow.
-E

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12/31/2006


Architecture is a marriage of the functional and the spritual, if the spaces we create do not move the heart and mind then they are surely only addressing one part of their function. Light is a good example. Any engineer can quantify the lumens required to brighten a passage or to read a book. But what about the poetic dimension of natural light: the changing nature of an overcast sky, the discovery of dappled shade, the intensity of a sunburst.”

-Norman Foster, from “Reflections.”

Sir Norman’s “personal statement about architecture, how it is understood and how it is perceived.” For Foster, the book reflects his belief that architecture is essentially a social art; a necessity and not a luxury; that it is generated by people’s needs, which are both spiritual and material. It has much to do with optimism, joy, and reassurance-of order in a disordered world, of privacy in the midst of many, of space in a crowded site, of light on a dull day. It is about quality – the quality of the space and the poetry of the light that models it.”

Thought I’d leave you with that, as we make disorder tonight.
Next year, perhaps we’ll return to order. We shall try.

If you’re in Chicago, today’s the last day for Bruce Mau’s exhibition, Massive Change at the Museum of Contemporary Art. Open until 5pm.

Hope to see you in ’07!
Happy, Healthy New Year to you and yours,
-Edward

12/31/2006


Architecture is a marriage of the functional and the spritual, if the spaces we create do not move the heart and mind then they are surely only addressing one part of their function. Light is a good example. Any engineer can quantify the lumens required to brighten a passage or to read a book. But what about the poetic dimension of natural light: the changing nature of an overcast sky, the discovery of dappled shade, the intensity of a sunburst.”

-Norman Foster, from “Reflections.”

Sir Norman’s “personal statement about architecture, how it is understood and how it is perceived.” For Foster, the book reflects his belief that architecture is essentially a social art; a necessity and not a luxury; that it is generated by people’s needs, which are both spiritual and material. It has much to do with optimism, joy, and reassurance-of order in a disordered world, of privacy in the midst of many, of space in a crowded site, of light on a dull day. It is about quality – the quality of the space and the poetry of the light that models it.”

Thought I’d leave you with that, as we make disorder tonight.
Next year, perhaps we’ll return to order. We shall try.

If you’re in Chicago, today’s the last day for Bruce Mau’s exhibition, Massive Change at the Museum of Contemporary Art. Open until 5pm.

Hope to see you in ’07!
Happy, Healthy New Year to you and yours,
-Edward

12/31/2006


Architecture is a marriage of the functional and the spritual, if the spaces we create do not move the heart and mind then they are surely only addressing one part of their function. Light is a good example. Any engineer can quantify the lumens required to brighten a passage or to read a book. But what about the poetic dimension of natural light: the changing nature of an overcast sky, the discovery of dappled shade, the intensity of a sunburst.”

-Norman Foster, from “Reflections.”

Sir Norman’s “personal statement about architecture, how it is understood and how it is perceived.” For Foster, the book reflects his belief that architecture is essentially a social art; a necessity and not a luxury; that it is generated by people’s needs, which are both spiritual and material. It has much to do with optimism, joy, and reassurance-of order in a disordered world, of privacy in the midst of many, of space in a crowded site, of light on a dull day. It is about quality – the quality of the space and the poetry of the light that models it.”

Thought I’d leave you with that, as we make disorder tonight.
Next year, perhaps we’ll return to order. We shall try.

If you’re in Chicago, today’s the last day for Bruce Mau’s exhibition, Massive Change at the Museum of Contemporary Art. Open until 5pm.

Hope to see you in ’07!
Happy, Healthy New Year to you and yours,
-Edward

10/29/2006

Bruce Mau Kowtow?

What’s going on here? Bruce Mau and his gang, along with Chicago’s Museum of Contemporary Art, placed an insert in today’s New York Times in the Chicago region.

In it they they praise Mayor Daley.

“Mayor Richard Daley is known for his heavy-duty green stripes.”

And of course, at the Massive Change and the City: Global Visionaries Symposium
On Saturday, November 18, 2006 Mayor Daley will present each speaker with a City of Chicago Global Visionaries Award. (What’s that? lol)

So it’s a love fest.

Good for Daley. And I’m glad he’s finally abandonning his blue bag recycling program – it never worked. Now he needs to improve public transit here.

And, do we agree? Bruce Mau loves text. He loves words. He loves layout. You see it in the exhibition and you see it in this very unusual ad in today’s paper. Ours is an image society. His ad stands out like a page for the New York Times 100 years ago. From the days when people read. If Bruce Mau can teach us to read again, more power to him.

Is that what he wants? Most who think on the ambitious scale that does – seek power.

Best,
-Edward

Here’s another fine take on the Mau show.