Archive for the ‘Mau’ Category

Betsky, Kipnis, Mau, Ryan, Nicholson Exploring Design in Chicago. Feb. 17 roundtable. Feb 18 Betsky lecture.

02/01/2008
Click on the poster to make it larger.

It could be the event of the year in Chicago. See you there!
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05/19/2007

Bruce Mau told me last night,

at the superbly fun benefit for Stanley Tigerman and Eva Maddox’s Archeworks,

that he is moving with his family to Chicago in July. He’ll open a school called
“The Institute for Massive Change.”

He’ll put it in Louis Sullivan’s inspiring department store building on State Street. Carson’s – the store in there for decades, recently vacated. Mau’s school will be in the same building as, and he will team up with Tony Jones and The School of the Art Institute of Chicago, which recently began teaching architecture on the top floors of the Sullivan masterpiece.

Bruce Mau said he intends to focus his activities on cities. He plans to develop “Chicago prototypes.” He hopes city planners and leaders around the world will note his achievements here, come here to study them, and then replicate them where needed. He told me that a developer working on a project in Korea wants to fund the prototype here, and if or when it’s successful, replicate the solution in Korea. I have no more details on that.

Mau will live on Chicago’s North Shore; he’s looking for a grand old house to turn “smart.” With all the visitors he expects he joked it’ll be something of an “eco-resort.” Tell that to the good ladies of Winnetka.

How did this come about? Bruce Mau said that he was gratified by the welcome he received in Chicago when he brought his exhibtion “Massive Change” to the Museum of Contemporary Art. He had lunch with Stanley Tigerman. Tigerman asked him, “What are you doing? Why aren’t you here?” Tigerman told Mau he could accomplish in ten years in Chicago what it would take him forty years to acheive in Toronto. Next thing you know, Mau’s moving his family to Chi-town and opening a school here.

Bruce Mau says he’s a big fan of Mayor Daley and the work he’s doing to make Chicago more “green.” Daley is also a fan of Mau and his work.

Finally, Bruce Mau says it’s too late to tone down the expectations people have for him, but that he’ll work here to realize his dreams here.

The “City of Broad Shoulders,” “the City that Works;” the city of “Make no Little Plans,” and “Build, Don’t Talk,” welcomes its latest big thinker. I’m so glad to see him come here and help spur the Chicago Renaissance.

Remember, Chicago’s motto has always been, “Urbs in Horto” – “City in a garden.”

Welcome Bruce Mau and family. Make the place grow.
-E

05/04/2007


Bruce Mau moving with his family to Chicago (?)

Is that why he’s smiling? Is the Canadian designer, big thinker, innovator, on his way? I missed the Daley Urban Forum, I’m out of town, but according to Gaper’s Block,

“At yesterday’s Daley Urban Forum, Bruce Mau, the designer/futurist behind the MCA’s recent “Massive Change” exhibit, confirmed that he’s not only going to open an office here, but he’s also moving his family down from Toronto. Why? He admires the city’s energy and our talent pool.”

I hear that in addition to other work, he’s to help Mayor Daley commemorate (and update) Burnham and Bennett’s Plan of Chicago, which turns 100 in 2009.

Jules Guerin from Burnham, Daniel H., and Edward H. Bennett, Plan of Chicago
The Commercial Club, Chicago MCMIX [1909]

We previously wrote about Mau here. (scroll down.)

-E

03/29/2007



Archeworks 2007 Benefit

Honoring Bruce Mau

Friday, May 18, 2007
6:30 PM – 10:00 PM
MCA Warehouse 1747 West Hubbard Street Chicago, Illinois, USA

This biennial event will once again feature a live auction with drawings by today’s most recognized and respected architects, designers and artists. Event proceeds to benefit Archeworks’s Community Design Projects.

What, no martinis? jk, see you there.
-grEEn

02/02/2007

Chicago – Toronto


Maybe Bruce Mau heard this four part Canadian Broadcasting Corporation series.

Lessons from Chicago

“Chicago and Toronto are, in many ways, remarkably similar. These two cities on the Great Lakes were once industrial powerhouses, and are now trying to find their place in the modern economy. Toronto’s Mayor David Miller and Chicago’s Mayor Richard Daley have even become friends, visiting each other’s cities in recent years.

Both cities are facing huge waves of immigration, downtown condo booms, urban sprawl, and crumbling infrastructure.

In Toronto, City Hall struggles financially to improve everything from public parks to the waterfront. As a result, those spaces sit idle, or deteriorate.

Chicago is different. A history of protecting the waterfront and encouraging public art has led Chicago to think of innovative ways to improve its public space.”

One installment is called “The Trump Effect.”

He’s currently constructing a 92-storey luxury condominium in downtown Chicago. He’s also proposing an equally ambitious 70-storey tower for downtown Toronto. And Trump wants his condos to command top dollar. In both cities, some of Trump’s condos are selling for more than $1,000 per square foot. These are prices previously unheard of.

02/02/2007

Chicago – Toronto


Maybe Bruce Mau heard this four part Canadian Broadcasting Corporation series.

Lessons from Chicago

“Chicago and Toronto are, in many ways, remarkably similar. These two cities on the Great Lakes were once industrial powerhouses, and are now trying to find their place in the modern economy. Toronto’s Mayor David Miller and Chicago’s Mayor Richard Daley have even become friends, visiting each other’s cities in recent years.

Both cities are facing huge waves of immigration, downtown condo booms, urban sprawl, and crumbling infrastructure.

In Toronto, City Hall struggles financially to improve everything from public parks to the waterfront. As a result, those spaces sit idle, or deteriorate.

Chicago is different. A history of protecting the waterfront and encouraging public art has led Chicago to think of innovative ways to improve its public space.”

One installment is called “The Trump Effect.”

He’s currently constructing a 92-storey luxury condominium in downtown Chicago. He’s also proposing an equally ambitious 70-storey tower for downtown Toronto. And Trump wants his condos to command top dollar. In both cities, some of Trump’s condos are selling for more than $1,000 per square foot. These are prices previously unheard of.

02/02/2007

Bruce Mau moving closer to Chicago’s Jolly Green Mayor! That’s the plan?

We had this back in November.
At the time Bruce Mau Design’s VP for Development commented,

Just a rumour, but we can’t deny that we’re looking to expand in the US imminently and that, yes, Chicago is a logical outpost, for five million reasons.
Great blog by the way.

Jim Shedden
VP, Development
Bruce Mau Design

And now it can be told. The Toronto Star reports that Bruce Mau Design will open a Chicago office before the end of June. [via] Interesting article for many reasons.

“Sources say there are other factors that make Chicago attractive. Increasingly since 9/11 high-end clients and partners prefer not to cross the border for a meeting. And Mau was seduced when Chicago, unlike his hometown, embraced Massive Change during its run at Chicago’s Museum of Contemporary Art last year.

“The light went on for both of us when we saw how everyone in Chicago, including the mayor, the artists and senior management teams, embraced Bruce,” says Mau’s business partner, Miles Nadal.
Mau and his wife, Aiyemobisi Williams, have told friends they are shopping for a house in Chicago and looking for schools for their three children.

According to Joanne Balles Crosbie, president of Bruce Mau Design, the idea of moving his family to Chicago is under consideration but has not been finalized. And the firm will keep its Toronto office open even if Mau does not reside here.”

And the word is his firm will work with Chicago Mayor Richard M. Daley on the 2009 centennial celebration of the publication of Daniel Burnham‘s “The Plan of Chicago.”

Lynn gets it right, as usual,

“If Mau is expecting the type of fawning he received here to continue in perpetuity, he’ll be in for rude awakening. Chicago, ultimately, is a tough town, with an allergy for puffery no matter how well intentioned. Massive Change was Mau’s Chicago romantic courtship. …

Still, Chicago was built by people who grew tired of where they came from and fell in love with the city, in all its contradictions. Think Sullivan, Mies, Daniel Burnham. If Mau can disenthrall himself from the flatterers – sycophancy is one of Chicago’s baser failings – and really engage the city, warts and all, he could be the next name in that line.”

I know we’re going to see “green” sprout all over here. So the time is right for Mau, now. Daley‘s Dad, Richard I, was content to just

turn the river green once a year and talk about workers downtown one day fishing in it for their lunches. That hasn’t quite happened yet, but, his son the current Mayor wants to turn the whole city green!


Not like this, I mean as in sustainable architecture….
(You know he’s Irish-American, born on Arbor Day – Richard M. Daley)

Good idea. And Mau has a few good ideas too.

-Edwardo

02/02/2007

Bruce Mau moving closer to Chicago’s Jolly Green Mayor! That’s the plan?

We had this back in November.
At the time Bruce Mau Design’s VP for Development commented,

Just a rumour, but we can’t deny that we’re looking to expand in the US imminently and that, yes, Chicago is a logical outpost, for five million reasons.
Great blog by the way.

Jim Shedden
VP, Development
Bruce Mau Design

And now it can be told. The Toronto Star reports that Bruce Mau Design will open a Chicago office before the end of June. [via] Interesting article for many reasons.

“Sources say there are other factors that make Chicago attractive. Increasingly since 9/11 high-end clients and partners prefer not to cross the border for a meeting. And Mau was seduced when Chicago, unlike his hometown, embraced Massive Change during its run at Chicago’s Museum of Contemporary Art last year.

“The light went on for both of us when we saw how everyone in Chicago, including the mayor, the artists and senior management teams, embraced Bruce,” says Mau’s business partner, Miles Nadal.
Mau and his wife, Aiyemobisi Williams, have told friends they are shopping for a house in Chicago and looking for schools for their three children.

According to Joanne Balles Crosbie, president of Bruce Mau Design, the idea of moving his family to Chicago is under consideration but has not been finalized. And the firm will keep its Toronto office open even if Mau does not reside here.”

And the word is his firm will work with Chicago Mayor Richard M. Daley on the 2009 centennial celebration of the publication of Daniel Burnham‘s “The Plan of Chicago.”

Lynn gets it right, as usual,

“If Mau is expecting the type of fawning he received here to continue in perpetuity, he’ll be in for rude awakening. Chicago, ultimately, is a tough town, with an allergy for puffery no matter how well intentioned. Massive Change was Mau’s Chicago romantic courtship. …

Still, Chicago was built by people who grew tired of where they came from and fell in love with the city, in all its contradictions. Think Sullivan, Mies, Daniel Burnham. If Mau can disenthrall himself from the flatterers – sycophancy is one of Chicago’s baser failings – and really engage the city, warts and all, he could be the next name in that line.”

I know we’re going to see “green” sprout all over here. So the time is right for Mau, now. Daley‘s Dad, Richard I, was content to just

turn the river green once a year and talk about workers downtown one day fishing in it for their lunches. That hasn’t quite happened yet, but, his son the current Mayor wants to turn the whole city green!


Not like this, I mean as in sustainable architecture….
(You know he’s Irish-American, born on Arbor Day – Richard M. Daley)

Good idea. And Mau has a few good ideas too.

-Edwardo

12/31/2006


Architecture is a marriage of the functional and the spritual, if the spaces we create do not move the heart and mind then they are surely only addressing one part of their function. Light is a good example. Any engineer can quantify the lumens required to brighten a passage or to read a book. But what about the poetic dimension of natural light: the changing nature of an overcast sky, the discovery of dappled shade, the intensity of a sunburst.”

-Norman Foster, from “Reflections.”

Sir Norman’s “personal statement about architecture, how it is understood and how it is perceived.” For Foster, the book reflects his belief that architecture is essentially a social art; a necessity and not a luxury; that it is generated by people’s needs, which are both spiritual and material. It has much to do with optimism, joy, and reassurance-of order in a disordered world, of privacy in the midst of many, of space in a crowded site, of light on a dull day. It is about quality – the quality of the space and the poetry of the light that models it.”

Thought I’d leave you with that, as we make disorder tonight.
Next year, perhaps we’ll return to order. We shall try.

If you’re in Chicago, today’s the last day for Bruce Mau’s exhibition, Massive Change at the Museum of Contemporary Art. Open until 5pm.

Hope to see you in ’07!
Happy, Healthy New Year to you and yours,
-Edward

12/31/2006


Architecture is a marriage of the functional and the spritual, if the spaces we create do not move the heart and mind then they are surely only addressing one part of their function. Light is a good example. Any engineer can quantify the lumens required to brighten a passage or to read a book. But what about the poetic dimension of natural light: the changing nature of an overcast sky, the discovery of dappled shade, the intensity of a sunburst.”

-Norman Foster, from “Reflections.”

Sir Norman’s “personal statement about architecture, how it is understood and how it is perceived.” For Foster, the book reflects his belief that architecture is essentially a social art; a necessity and not a luxury; that it is generated by people’s needs, which are both spiritual and material. It has much to do with optimism, joy, and reassurance-of order in a disordered world, of privacy in the midst of many, of space in a crowded site, of light on a dull day. It is about quality – the quality of the space and the poetry of the light that models it.”

Thought I’d leave you with that, as we make disorder tonight.
Next year, perhaps we’ll return to order. We shall try.

If you’re in Chicago, today’s the last day for Bruce Mau’s exhibition, Massive Change at the Museum of Contemporary Art. Open until 5pm.

Hope to see you in ’07!
Happy, Healthy New Year to you and yours,
-Edward