Archive for the ‘Mies van der Rohe’ Category

Jeanne Gang’s Aqua tower in Chicago looking good

06/19/2008

Romantic, retro.


Seen from the river, from which Aqua takes it name. It’s by the Chicago river, and Lake Michigan. When finished, it’ll be 82 stories, topped by a green roof.


And Aqua looks to meet the earth in an urbane manner.



While it’s hard to find precedent in boxy Chicago for the Aqua tower, how about this: Bertrand Goldberg’s River City, which also flows and undulates next to the water


If you, like me, admire Jeanne Gang‘s work, read about her in the latest Metropolis. And don’t miss the slide show of what she’s done, and what’s to come. She and partner Mark Schendel are shining stars in Chicago. And Aqua is the most expensive project ever awarded to an American firm headed by a woman.

Other projects undulate, such as this early model of Frank Gehry’s Beekman Tower in New York.


But Studio Gang’s is different, the way it moves side to side, and moves organically, it’s more like Chicago’s famous “Little Egypt,” who danced the danse du ventre at the 1893 World’s Fair.



It dances, doesn’t it?

At times, Aqua looks like someone left a Mies out in the rain.


Which then reminds me of Rem Koolhaas. He once photoshopped breasts onto a Miesian flat facade.


Jeanne Gang and Mark Schendel worked for Koolhaas in the Netherlands.

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06/26/2007
Lego Farnsworth!


My reader “Spy” sends in this fantastic

Lego Farnsworth House


(How do you like that slip-sliding typography, like the house itself, no? (smile))

The stairs on the model seem a little off in size, placement and number, and what’s the bench on the deck? And the deck is not long enough, and the landscaping is odd – one great sugar maple needed – but why be a perfectionist about Mies? I love it; thanks Flickr and thanks “Spy”!

-Edward

12/10/2006

House Museums
Those who know me know I love house and studio museums. I believe the spirit of the artist comes through in the places they were.

And I love museums dedicated to one artist. Especially when they then have solo shows of other artists.

The building above, in downtown Chicago, should house one but doesn’t. It’s a perfect location, a block from the tourist-frequented John Hancock building, and across Pearson Street from the Museum of Contemporary Art.

If you don’t know who lived there, I’ll tell you in a second. But first, I digress.

In Paris I loved the Bourdelle Museum. No, it’s not the bordello museum ya numbskull! It shows the sculpture of Antoine Bourdelle.


I love the garden there, there used to be nobody around.
Zadkine has a nice house and studio museum in Paris too. These places make city life richer. And history come alive.

Here in Chicago I wish we had (with the cooperation of the owner) turned the second floor apartment in Lincoln Park in which

Henry Darger lived, for more than 40 years, until about 1973. It would have been a special house museum and a great attraction for visitors. I believe the space contained secrets.

There he wrote and illustrated his 19,000 page long book, ‘The Story of the Vivian Girls, in what is Known as the Realms of the Unreal, of the Glandeco-Angelinian War Storm, Caused by the Child Slave Rebellion.’ Is Darger’s America’s Van Gogh? He is a fine colorist.

And then there is the place above. A space we know was inhabited by a great artist, an original thinker. There he lived for nearly thirty years.


In a few rooms in 200 East Pearson, on the corner of Pearson, and — yes, we have done it – Mies van der Rohe way. (I love to hear the bus drivers pronounce it, and I’ve yet to meet one who knows who Mies was.) I’d love to see it turned into a Ludwig Mies van der Rohe House Museum one day. When the currrent owner (a fine architect) wills it.

As I said it’s right across the street from Chicago’s Museum of Contemporary Art (although a great old armory sat there when Mies lived on Pearson) and they could administer it.


Wouldn’t a Mies museum across the street draw more people also to the MCA?

Inside the Mies House let’s display objects he designed, and some of the things he owned.
Plus printed matter and a room of videos of him and of others explaining his work and his influence.

And from this very central location in Chicago, right near 860 – 880 Lake Shore Drive, 900 – 910 Lake Shore Drive, and the Arts Club staircase, launch Mies tours including to IIT and the Farnsworth House. Serve martinis if you like !

Would you come visit?

-Edoardo

In 1941 Mies moved his residence from a Chicago hotel to 200 East Pearson Street, Chicago, IL, USA, where he lived until his death in 1969. Other than painting the walls white, the only change he made in the apartment was to built two wall shelves cantilevered on both sides of a gypsum block wall that separated the living room from a bedroom.

12/10/2006

House Museums
Those who know me know I love house and studio museums. I believe the spirit of the artist comes through in the places they were.

And I love museums dedicated to one artist. Especially when they then have solo shows of other artists.

The building above, in downtown Chicago, should house one but doesn’t. It’s a perfect location, a block from the tourist-frequented John Hancock building, and across Pearson Street from the Museum of Contemporary Art.

If you don’t know who lived there, I’ll tell you in a second. But first, I digress.

In Paris I loved the Bourdelle Museum. No, it’s not the bordello museum ya numbskull! It shows the sculpture of Antoine Bourdelle.


I love the garden there, there used to be nobody around.
Zadkine has a nice house and studio museum in Paris too. These places make city life richer. And history come alive.

Here in Chicago I wish we had (with the cooperation of the owner) turned the second floor apartment in Lincoln Park in which

Henry Darger lived, for more than 40 years, until about 1973. It would have been a special house museum and a great attraction for visitors. I believe the space contained secrets.

There he wrote and illustrated his 19,000 page long book, ‘The Story of the Vivian Girls, in what is Known as the Realms of the Unreal, of the Glandeco-Angelinian War Storm, Caused by the Child Slave Rebellion.’ Is Darger’s America’s Van Gogh? He is a fine colorist.

And then there is the place above. A space we know was inhabited by a great artist, an original thinker. There he lived for nearly thirty years.


In a few rooms in 200 East Pearson, on the corner of Pearson, and — yes, we have done it – Mies van der Rohe way. (I love to hear the bus drivers pronounce it, and I’ve yet to meet one who knows who Mies was.) I’d love to see it turned into a Ludwig Mies van der Rohe House Museum one day. When the currrent owner (a fine architect) wills it.

As I said it’s right across the street from Chicago’s Museum of Contemporary Art (although a great old armory sat there when Mies lived on Pearson) and they could administer it.


Wouldn’t a Mies museum across the street draw more people also to the MCA?

Inside the Mies House let’s display objects he designed, and some of the things he owned.
Plus printed matter and a room of videos of him and of others explaining his work and his influence.

And from this very central location in Chicago, right near 860 – 880 Lake Shore Drive, 900 – 910 Lake Shore Drive, and the Arts Club staircase, launch Mies tours including to IIT and the Farnsworth House. Serve martinis if you like !

Would you come visit?

-Edoardo

In 1941 Mies moved his residence from a Chicago hotel to 200 East Pearson Street, Chicago, IL, USA, where he lived until his death in 1969. Other than painting the walls white, the only change he made in the apartment was to built two wall shelves cantilevered on both sides of a gypsum block wall that separated the living room from a bedroom.

12/10/2006

House Museums
Those who know me know I love house and studio museums. I believe the spirit of the artist comes through in the places they were.

And I love museums dedicated to one artist. Especially when they then have solo shows of other artists.

The building above, in downtown Chicago, should house one but doesn’t. It’s a perfect location, a block from the tourist-frequented John Hancock building, and across Pearson Street from the Museum of Contemporary Art.

If you don’t know who lived there, I’ll tell you in a second. But first, I digress.

In Paris I loved the Bourdelle Museum. No, it’s not the bordello museum ya numbskull! It shows the sculpture of Antoine Bourdelle.


I love the garden there, there used to be nobody around.
Zadkine has a nice house and studio museum in Paris too. These places make city life richer. And history come alive.

Here in Chicago I wish we had (with the cooperation of the owner) turned the second floor apartment in Lincoln Park in which

Henry Darger lived, for more than 40 years, until about 1973. It would have been a special house museum and a great attraction for visitors. I believe the space contained secrets.

There he wrote and illustrated his 19,000 page long book, ‘The Story of the Vivian Girls, in what is Known as the Realms of the Unreal, of the Glandeco-Angelinian War Storm, Caused by the Child Slave Rebellion.’ Is Darger’s America’s Van Gogh? He is a fine colorist.

And then there is the place above. A space we know was inhabited by a great artist, an original thinker. There he lived for nearly thirty years.


In a few rooms in 200 East Pearson, on the corner of Pearson, and — yes, we have done it – Mies van der Rohe way. (I love to hear the bus drivers pronounce it, and I’ve yet to meet one who knows who Mies was.) I’d love to see it turned into a Ludwig Mies van der Rohe House Museum one day. When the currrent owner (a fine architect) wills it.

As I said it’s right across the street from Chicago’s Museum of Contemporary Art (although a great old armory sat there when Mies lived on Pearson) and they could administer it.


Wouldn’t a Mies museum across the street draw more people also to the MCA?

Inside the Mies House let’s display objects he designed, and some of the things he owned.
Plus printed matter and a room of videos of him and of others explaining his work and his influence.

And from this very central location in Chicago, right near 860 – 880 Lake Shore Drive, 900 – 910 Lake Shore Drive, and the Arts Club staircase, launch Mies tours including to IIT and the Farnsworth House. Serve martinis if you like !

Would you come visit?

-Edoardo

In 1941 Mies moved his residence from a Chicago hotel to 200 East Pearson Street, Chicago, IL, USA, where he lived until his death in 1969. Other than painting the walls white, the only change he made in the apartment was to built two wall shelves cantilevered on both sides of a gypsum block wall that separated the living room from a bedroom.

11/23/2006

A fine day in the suburbs.

After looking, and trying not to, at

I happened, not for the first time, onto

Helmut Jahn’s Shure, Inc. (Built as Ha-Lo)

It’s pretty

spectacular.

But the big surprise was

A low-slung addition. I’d also seen this before, even recently, but I guess I hadn’t been ready for it then. Or it hadn’t been ready for me. Or the light was wrong, or, well…

The addition to the Jahn is not spectacular. It is something else.

In here, engineers design new Shure microphones.

And as the sun set, and they went home for Thanksgiving,

I couldn’t tear myself away from the building.
I walked around it and listened,

and looked at how it met the original structure

respectfully. With a gap.

In the lobby and outside it felt quiet and peaceful.
I watched the sun set behind it, and come through it.

And then I got it. The building whispered to me who its father was.

Crown Hall .
The serenity in the Shure building springs out of
Crown Hall, the architecture school designed by Mies van der Rohe
at the Illinois Institute of Technology.

Shure addition architects Ron Krueck and Mark Sexton know it well. They studied in, taught in and masterfully restored Crown Hall, not long ago.

Peace, in the suburbs,
Now I can have my Thanksgiving.
I hope yours is satisfying too.

-Mr. Edward Lifson

11/23/2006

A fine day in the suburbs.

After looking, and trying not to, at

I happened, not for the first time, onto

Helmut Jahn’s Shure, Inc. (Built as Ha-Lo)

It’s pretty

spectacular.

But the big surprise was

A low-slung addition. I’d also seen this before, even recently, but I guess I hadn’t been ready for it then. Or it hadn’t been ready for me. Or the light was wrong, or, well…

The addition to the Jahn is not spectacular. It is something else.

In here, engineers design new Shure microphones.

And as the sun set, and they went home for Thanksgiving,

I couldn’t tear myself away from the building.
I walked around it and listened,

and looked at how it met the original structure

respectfully. With a gap.

In the lobby and outside it felt quiet and peaceful.
I watched the sun set behind it, and come through it.

And then I got it. The building whispered to me who its father was.

Crown Hall .
The serenity in the Shure building springs out of
Crown Hall, the architecture school designed by Mies van der Rohe
at the Illinois Institute of Technology.

Shure addition architects Ron Krueck and Mark Sexton know it well. They studied in, taught in and masterfully restored Crown Hall, not long ago.

Peace, in the suburbs,
Now I can have my Thanksgiving.
I hope yours is satisfying too.

-Mr. Edward Lifson