Archive for the ‘Museum of Contemporary Art’ Category

01/27/2007

Stingel and Shiva.


He puts the tools of his trade in the hands of Shiva.

Scissors, glue, paint, a brush, etc.


Are we glad that he didn’t use Muhammad?

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01/27/2007

Stingel and Shiva.


He puts the tools of his trade in the hands of Shiva.

Scissors, glue, paint, a brush, etc.


Are we glad that he didn’t use Muhammad?

01/26/2007

Do you like Orange?
Rudolf Stingel
at Chicago’s Museum of Contemporary Art;
later going to the Whitney.

Stingel covered the main foyer with silvery insulation, added a gaudy chandelier and a cornice on top to make the room more classically proportioned.

It’s amazing how this kunsthalle can change its atmosphere so thoroughly. It makes it thrilling to return often. With each incarnation you layer the memories in your mind; and your relationship to the space deepens. As when you watch a child grow through phases.

In the first gallery on the left,

enter – a ‘color field’ room.

You might think you don’t like orange carpet, but this room warms the heart, feels very still and quiet and comfortable. People will lie down in here and calmness will reign!

It’s nice to see a room not filled with ‘things’. Especially in a museum.

On those walls covered with

shiny metallic film

people are invited to scrawl,


This began unintentionally at a previous Stingel show elsewhere. But is this the first time museum goers embed objects in a Stingel wall?

The least successful room holds a very large and very foreshortened self-portrait.


If you still think you don’t like orange, there’s another gallery with a white carpet. This one is on the wall. And people write in it with their finger.


Reminded me somehow of the wall in Jerusalem. People put notes in that too. But would that make this religious somehow? Well, it is. See the next two posts. And all good art is.

And that orange, it’s like a beautiful g-dgiven sunset.

-Edwardo

01/26/2007

Do you like Orange?
Rudolf Stingel
at Chicago’s Museum of Contemporary Art;
later going to the Whitney.

Stingel covered the main foyer with silvery insulation, added a gaudy chandelier and a cornice on top to make the room more classically proportioned.

It’s amazing how this kunsthalle can change its atmosphere so thoroughly. It makes it thrilling to return often. With each incarnation you layer the memories in your mind; and your relationship to the space deepens. As when you watch a child grow through phases.

In the first gallery on the left,

enter – a ‘color field’ room.

You might think you don’t like orange carpet, but this room warms the heart, feels very still and quiet and comfortable. People will lie down in here and calmness will reign!

It’s nice to see a room not filled with ‘things’. Especially in a museum.

On those walls covered with

shiny metallic film

people are invited to scrawl,


This began unintentionally at a previous Stingel show elsewhere. But is this the first time museum goers embed objects in a Stingel wall?

The least successful room holds a very large and very foreshortened self-portrait.


If you still think you don’t like orange, there’s another gallery with a white carpet. This one is on the wall. And people write in it with their finger.


Reminded me somehow of the wall in Jerusalem. People put notes in that too. But would that make this religious somehow? Well, it is. See the next two posts. And all good art is.

And that orange, it’s like a beautiful g-dgiven sunset.

-Edwardo

01/26/2007

Do you like Orange?
Rudolf Stingel
at Chicago’s Museum of Contemporary Art;
later going to the Whitney.

Stingel covered the main foyer with silvery insulation, added a gaudy chandelier and a cornice on top to make the room more classically proportioned.

It’s amazing how this kunsthalle can change its atmosphere so thoroughly. It makes it thrilling to return often. With each incarnation you layer the memories in your mind; and your relationship to the space deepens. As when you watch a child grow through phases.

In the first gallery on the left,

enter – a ‘color field’ room.

You might think you don’t like orange carpet, but this room warms the heart, feels very still and quiet and comfortable. People will lie down in here and calmness will reign!

It’s nice to see a room not filled with ‘things’. Especially in a museum.

On those walls covered with

shiny metallic film

people are invited to scrawl,


This began unintentionally at a previous Stingel show elsewhere. But is this the first time museum goers embed objects in a Stingel wall?

The least successful room holds a very large and very foreshortened self-portrait.


If you still think you don’t like orange, there’s another gallery with a white carpet. This one is on the wall. And people write in it with their finger.


Reminded me somehow of the wall in Jerusalem. People put notes in that too. But would that make this religious somehow? Well, it is. See the next two posts. And all good art is.

And that orange, it’s like a beautiful g-dgiven sunset.

-Edwardo

12/10/2006

House Museums
Those who know me know I love house and studio museums. I believe the spirit of the artist comes through in the places they were.

And I love museums dedicated to one artist. Especially when they then have solo shows of other artists.

The building above, in downtown Chicago, should house one but doesn’t. It’s a perfect location, a block from the tourist-frequented John Hancock building, and across Pearson Street from the Museum of Contemporary Art.

If you don’t know who lived there, I’ll tell you in a second. But first, I digress.

In Paris I loved the Bourdelle Museum. No, it’s not the bordello museum ya numbskull! It shows the sculpture of Antoine Bourdelle.


I love the garden there, there used to be nobody around.
Zadkine has a nice house and studio museum in Paris too. These places make city life richer. And history come alive.

Here in Chicago I wish we had (with the cooperation of the owner) turned the second floor apartment in Lincoln Park in which

Henry Darger lived, for more than 40 years, until about 1973. It would have been a special house museum and a great attraction for visitors. I believe the space contained secrets.

There he wrote and illustrated his 19,000 page long book, ‘The Story of the Vivian Girls, in what is Known as the Realms of the Unreal, of the Glandeco-Angelinian War Storm, Caused by the Child Slave Rebellion.’ Is Darger’s America’s Van Gogh? He is a fine colorist.

And then there is the place above. A space we know was inhabited by a great artist, an original thinker. There he lived for nearly thirty years.


In a few rooms in 200 East Pearson, on the corner of Pearson, and — yes, we have done it – Mies van der Rohe way. (I love to hear the bus drivers pronounce it, and I’ve yet to meet one who knows who Mies was.) I’d love to see it turned into a Ludwig Mies van der Rohe House Museum one day. When the currrent owner (a fine architect) wills it.

As I said it’s right across the street from Chicago’s Museum of Contemporary Art (although a great old armory sat there when Mies lived on Pearson) and they could administer it.


Wouldn’t a Mies museum across the street draw more people also to the MCA?

Inside the Mies House let’s display objects he designed, and some of the things he owned.
Plus printed matter and a room of videos of him and of others explaining his work and his influence.

And from this very central location in Chicago, right near 860 – 880 Lake Shore Drive, 900 – 910 Lake Shore Drive, and the Arts Club staircase, launch Mies tours including to IIT and the Farnsworth House. Serve martinis if you like !

Would you come visit?

-Edoardo

In 1941 Mies moved his residence from a Chicago hotel to 200 East Pearson Street, Chicago, IL, USA, where he lived until his death in 1969. Other than painting the walls white, the only change he made in the apartment was to built two wall shelves cantilevered on both sides of a gypsum block wall that separated the living room from a bedroom.

12/10/2006

House Museums
Those who know me know I love house and studio museums. I believe the spirit of the artist comes through in the places they were.

And I love museums dedicated to one artist. Especially when they then have solo shows of other artists.

The building above, in downtown Chicago, should house one but doesn’t. It’s a perfect location, a block from the tourist-frequented John Hancock building, and across Pearson Street from the Museum of Contemporary Art.

If you don’t know who lived there, I’ll tell you in a second. But first, I digress.

In Paris I loved the Bourdelle Museum. No, it’s not the bordello museum ya numbskull! It shows the sculpture of Antoine Bourdelle.


I love the garden there, there used to be nobody around.
Zadkine has a nice house and studio museum in Paris too. These places make city life richer. And history come alive.

Here in Chicago I wish we had (with the cooperation of the owner) turned the second floor apartment in Lincoln Park in which

Henry Darger lived, for more than 40 years, until about 1973. It would have been a special house museum and a great attraction for visitors. I believe the space contained secrets.

There he wrote and illustrated his 19,000 page long book, ‘The Story of the Vivian Girls, in what is Known as the Realms of the Unreal, of the Glandeco-Angelinian War Storm, Caused by the Child Slave Rebellion.’ Is Darger’s America’s Van Gogh? He is a fine colorist.

And then there is the place above. A space we know was inhabited by a great artist, an original thinker. There he lived for nearly thirty years.


In a few rooms in 200 East Pearson, on the corner of Pearson, and — yes, we have done it – Mies van der Rohe way. (I love to hear the bus drivers pronounce it, and I’ve yet to meet one who knows who Mies was.) I’d love to see it turned into a Ludwig Mies van der Rohe House Museum one day. When the currrent owner (a fine architect) wills it.

As I said it’s right across the street from Chicago’s Museum of Contemporary Art (although a great old armory sat there when Mies lived on Pearson) and they could administer it.


Wouldn’t a Mies museum across the street draw more people also to the MCA?

Inside the Mies House let’s display objects he designed, and some of the things he owned.
Plus printed matter and a room of videos of him and of others explaining his work and his influence.

And from this very central location in Chicago, right near 860 – 880 Lake Shore Drive, 900 – 910 Lake Shore Drive, and the Arts Club staircase, launch Mies tours including to IIT and the Farnsworth House. Serve martinis if you like !

Would you come visit?

-Edoardo

In 1941 Mies moved his residence from a Chicago hotel to 200 East Pearson Street, Chicago, IL, USA, where he lived until his death in 1969. Other than painting the walls white, the only change he made in the apartment was to built two wall shelves cantilevered on both sides of a gypsum block wall that separated the living room from a bedroom.

12/10/2006

House Museums
Those who know me know I love house and studio museums. I believe the spirit of the artist comes through in the places they were.

And I love museums dedicated to one artist. Especially when they then have solo shows of other artists.

The building above, in downtown Chicago, should house one but doesn’t. It’s a perfect location, a block from the tourist-frequented John Hancock building, and across Pearson Street from the Museum of Contemporary Art.

If you don’t know who lived there, I’ll tell you in a second. But first, I digress.

In Paris I loved the Bourdelle Museum. No, it’s not the bordello museum ya numbskull! It shows the sculpture of Antoine Bourdelle.


I love the garden there, there used to be nobody around.
Zadkine has a nice house and studio museum in Paris too. These places make city life richer. And history come alive.

Here in Chicago I wish we had (with the cooperation of the owner) turned the second floor apartment in Lincoln Park in which

Henry Darger lived, for more than 40 years, until about 1973. It would have been a special house museum and a great attraction for visitors. I believe the space contained secrets.

There he wrote and illustrated his 19,000 page long book, ‘The Story of the Vivian Girls, in what is Known as the Realms of the Unreal, of the Glandeco-Angelinian War Storm, Caused by the Child Slave Rebellion.’ Is Darger’s America’s Van Gogh? He is a fine colorist.

And then there is the place above. A space we know was inhabited by a great artist, an original thinker. There he lived for nearly thirty years.


In a few rooms in 200 East Pearson, on the corner of Pearson, and — yes, we have done it – Mies van der Rohe way. (I love to hear the bus drivers pronounce it, and I’ve yet to meet one who knows who Mies was.) I’d love to see it turned into a Ludwig Mies van der Rohe House Museum one day. When the currrent owner (a fine architect) wills it.

As I said it’s right across the street from Chicago’s Museum of Contemporary Art (although a great old armory sat there when Mies lived on Pearson) and they could administer it.


Wouldn’t a Mies museum across the street draw more people also to the MCA?

Inside the Mies House let’s display objects he designed, and some of the things he owned.
Plus printed matter and a room of videos of him and of others explaining his work and his influence.

And from this very central location in Chicago, right near 860 – 880 Lake Shore Drive, 900 – 910 Lake Shore Drive, and the Arts Club staircase, launch Mies tours including to IIT and the Farnsworth House. Serve martinis if you like !

Would you come visit?

-Edoardo

In 1941 Mies moved his residence from a Chicago hotel to 200 East Pearson Street, Chicago, IL, USA, where he lived until his death in 1969. Other than painting the walls white, the only change he made in the apartment was to built two wall shelves cantilevered on both sides of a gypsum block wall that separated the living room from a bedroom.

11/30/2006

The difference between Detroit and New York.

As each gets a new museum for contemporary art.

Where would you rather live?

And I thought ours was bad!

-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-

Of course one can’t compare.

The odds were stacked like the boxes in New York.

NY’s New Museum spent $50 million on their building on the Bowery. They had considered just renovating an old warehouse in Brooklyn. But they thought big and beautiful, which contemporary art deserves.

The building in Detroit is a much lower cost conversion, from an old car dealership.

But here’s what troubles me.

Nicolai says in the NYT that the Detroit building “accepts decay as fact.”

And the architect, Andrew Zago

“draws inspiration from the squatters’ houses, performance spaces, local bars and grass-roots art projects that have sprouted amid the disturbing stillness of the neighborhoods: a kind of forgotten underworld tucked into ruined houses and storefronts surrounded by lots that have been abandoned for so long that they have become overgrown fields.

The architect had no interest in smoothing over the scars, which are worn as badges of pride.

To save money, he placed the museum’s mechanical systems, typically hidden atop the roof, in a corner of a gallery, wrapped in a chain link fence. Warmth is provided by a series of heat lamps suspended from the ceiling, as they might be in a public parking garage.”

Is this how to revive a city?

I see that a lot of deep thought went into this creation – for example I like the big glass garage doors that roll up in the summer to open the museum to the community, and that its galleries run around a large community space with a bookstore and a cafe. The budget was small and they hope to raise $5.5 million more for a more elaborate renovation by Mr. Zago that could be completed by 2010. The cafe will be extended and a sculpture garden is planned. So judgement must wait.

But I think that our civic institutions ought not slide down to the level of hoodlums. We raise the neighborhood up by providing exaltation in an art museum, not by romanticizing decay.

-E

11/30/2006

The difference between Detroit and New York.

As each gets a new museum for contemporary art.

Where would you rather live?

And I thought ours was bad!

-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-

Of course one can’t compare.

The odds were stacked like the boxes in New York.

NY’s New Museum spent $50 million on their building on the Bowery. They had considered just renovating an old warehouse in Brooklyn. But they thought big and beautiful, which contemporary art deserves.

The building in Detroit is a much lower cost conversion, from an old car dealership.

But here’s what troubles me.

Nicolai says in the NYT that the Detroit building “accepts decay as fact.”

And the architect, Andrew Zago

“draws inspiration from the squatters’ houses, performance spaces, local bars and grass-roots art projects that have sprouted amid the disturbing stillness of the neighborhoods: a kind of forgotten underworld tucked into ruined houses and storefronts surrounded by lots that have been abandoned for so long that they have become overgrown fields.

The architect had no interest in smoothing over the scars, which are worn as badges of pride.

To save money, he placed the museum’s mechanical systems, typically hidden atop the roof, in a corner of a gallery, wrapped in a chain link fence. Warmth is provided by a series of heat lamps suspended from the ceiling, as they might be in a public parking garage.”

Is this how to revive a city?

I see that a lot of deep thought went into this creation – for example I like the big glass garage doors that roll up in the summer to open the museum to the community, and that its galleries run around a large community space with a bookstore and a cafe. The budget was small and they hope to raise $5.5 million more for a more elaborate renovation by Mr. Zago that could be completed by 2010. The cafe will be extended and a sculpture garden is planned. So judgement must wait.

But I think that our civic institutions ought not slide down to the level of hoodlums. We raise the neighborhood up by providing exaltation in an art museum, not by romanticizing decay.

-E