Archive for the ‘oral history’ Category

01/23/2007

My, my, Myron


At the Arts Club of Chicago last night, for the Joyce Awards. Got a sneak preview of the Myron Goldsmith exhibition, to open January 31. “Memories of Myron Goldsmith.”


Large-scale, black-and-white photographs of 10 works by the late Chicago architect.

Myron Goldsmith’s works include the offices and printing plant of The Republic newspaper in Columbus, Indiana. (1971, and gorgeous, and barely mentioned on the website for the Republic.)

The Cook County Administration Building (ne’ Brunswick), stared at constantly by no less than

Chicago’s Picasso. And

tragically, six people lost their lives there as a result of a fire in 2003.

The unbuilt ‘Ruck-a-Chucky’ Bridge (love the name! – done with T.Y. Lin and others) for a site in California
and the Solar Telescope, at Kitt Peak, Arizona, (1962).


He superintended the construction of the Farnsworth House, having trained with Mies since the late ’30’s.

“I’ve always considered myself extremely lucky that here I was in a sort of third-rate school, Armour, and due to no efforts of my own, in walks Mies in 1938…”

Lucky Man!, but,

“There was another factor: the war was now going on. It was very disturbing. It was awful. It was very well known, German anti-Semitism. That was not a very good period to study architecture, with the world falling to pieces around you…

See how he built up the world, in a very post-war way, beginning January 31, at the Arts Club of Chicago. And as you stare at the modernity in his work, remember these words of Myron Goldsmith, also from his oral history,

“If some architects believed that architecture would reform society, change society? I did not. I did not really have those aspirations. I had hoped to do something nice that would give pleasure and be a nice thing.”


-E.

Ruck-A-Chucky Bridge; Auburn, California, 1980. Rendering by D. Hansen. Photo courtesy of SOM.
Kitt Peak 1962. Photo by Ezra Stoller

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01/23/2007

My, my, Myron


At the Arts Club of Chicago last night, for the Joyce Awards. Got a sneak preview of the Myron Goldsmith exhibition, to open January 31. “Memories of Myron Goldsmith.”


Large-scale, black-and-white photographs of 10 works by the late Chicago architect.

Myron Goldsmith’s works include the offices and printing plant of The Republic newspaper in Columbus, Indiana. (1971, and gorgeous, and barely mentioned on the website for the Republic.)

The Cook County Administration Building (ne’ Brunswick), stared at constantly by no less than

Chicago’s Picasso. And

tragically, six people lost their lives there as a result of a fire in 2003.

The unbuilt ‘Ruck-a-Chucky’ Bridge (love the name! – done with T.Y. Lin and others) for a site in California
and the Solar Telescope, at Kitt Peak, Arizona, (1962).


He superintended the construction of the Farnsworth House, having trained with Mies since the late ’30’s.

“I’ve always considered myself extremely lucky that here I was in a sort of third-rate school, Armour, and due to no efforts of my own, in walks Mies in 1938…”

Lucky Man!, but,

“There was another factor: the war was now going on. It was very disturbing. It was awful. It was very well known, German anti-Semitism. That was not a very good period to study architecture, with the world falling to pieces around you…

See how he built up the world, in a very post-war way, beginning January 31, at the Arts Club of Chicago. And as you stare at the modernity in his work, remember these words of Myron Goldsmith, also from his oral history,

“If some architects believed that architecture would reform society, change society? I did not. I did not really have those aspirations. I had hoped to do something nice that would give pleasure and be a nice thing.”


-E.

Ruck-A-Chucky Bridge; Auburn, California, 1980. Rendering by D. Hansen. Photo courtesy of SOM.
Kitt Peak 1962. Photo by Ezra Stoller

01/23/2007

My, my, Myron


At the Arts Club of Chicago last night, for the Joyce Awards. Got a sneak preview of the Myron Goldsmith exhibition, to open January 31. “Memories of Myron Goldsmith.”


Large-scale, black-and-white photographs of 10 works by the late Chicago architect.

Myron Goldsmith’s works include the offices and printing plant of The Republic newspaper in Columbus, Indiana. (1971, and gorgeous, and barely mentioned on the website for the Republic.)

The Cook County Administration Building (ne’ Brunswick), stared at constantly by no less than

Chicago’s Picasso. And

tragically, six people lost their lives there as a result of a fire in 2003.

The unbuilt ‘Ruck-a-Chucky’ Bridge (love the name! – done with T.Y. Lin and others) for a site in California
and the Solar Telescope, at Kitt Peak, Arizona, (1962).


He superintended the construction of the Farnsworth House, having trained with Mies since the late ’30’s.

“I’ve always considered myself extremely lucky that here I was in a sort of third-rate school, Armour, and due to no efforts of my own, in walks Mies in 1938…”

Lucky Man!, but,

“There was another factor: the war was now going on. It was very disturbing. It was awful. It was very well known, German anti-Semitism. That was not a very good period to study architecture, with the world falling to pieces around you…

See how he built up the world, in a very post-war way, beginning January 31, at the Arts Club of Chicago. And as you stare at the modernity in his work, remember these words of Myron Goldsmith, also from his oral history,

“If some architects believed that architecture would reform society, change society? I did not. I did not really have those aspirations. I had hoped to do something nice that would give pleasure and be a nice thing.”


-E.

Ruck-A-Chucky Bridge; Auburn, California, 1980. Rendering by D. Hansen. Photo courtesy of SOM.
Kitt Peak 1962. Photo by Ezra Stoller