Archive for the ‘piazza’ Category

12/16/2006

” …who was that mysterious tenor in full costume warming up in my dressing room when I came in Sunday night?”

I love this note-by-note of
il scandolo Alagna.

But can the writer really remember that many divine details of the performance?

Last Thursday, after boos from the La Scala crowd, Roberto Alagna walked off stage during his performance in Aida at La Scala. When the audience realized he was not coming back they shouted , “Vergogna! ” (shame) and “Buffone!” (fool!)

La Scala later served Alagna notice that he would not be invited back to complete the run.
So then,

“Alagna descended into full-fledged grassy knoll paranoia talking about mysterious threatening phone calls, unknown figures making karate chop motions in his direction as he entered the theater Sunday night, and other signs that the La Scala was conspiring to force him out. When that didn’t fly, he gave physical problems a whirl — my throat closed up, my blood sugar plummeted, why didn’t Chailly stop the performance to check on me?; that’s what Muti did when Domingo nearly fainted in ‘Otello’ — they could wait an hour for Domingo and not a few minutes for me?, and who was that mysterious tenor in full costume warming up in my dressing room when I came in Sunday night?”

Now Corriere reports that Thursday evening, since he had been replaced onstage, Alagna took to the piazza in front of the opera house to stage his own ‘one-man show’ in piazza!

“Presenting himself a few minutes before the beginning of the performance inside of Aida, Alagna began to sing his part, surrounded by curious onlookers and photographers.

Then, looking at il Teatro La Scala, he sang a passage from Puccini’s Madame Butterfly
«Addio fiorito asil, di letizia e d’amore»
.
Goodbye flowered exile, of joy and love!


Then with his cell phone, he snapped a photo of the theater. ‘I came to have a reminder, my last happy memory of la Scala, since I don’t know when I’ll be able to see her again.'”

Ah Italia!
Wish I’d been there. You know I like piazza life.
Sunday eve I did pass through Chicago’s Piazza San Giovanni. A few drunk guys were singing about football….

-E

Alagna story via.

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12/16/2006

” …who was that mysterious tenor in full costume warming up in my dressing room when I came in Sunday night?”

I love this note-by-note of
il scandolo Alagna.

But can the writer really remember that many divine details of the performance?

Last Thursday, after boos from the La Scala crowd, Roberto Alagna walked off stage during his performance in Aida at La Scala. When the audience realized he was not coming back they shouted , “Vergogna! ” (shame) and “Buffone!” (fool!)

La Scala later served Alagna notice that he would not be invited back to complete the run.
So then,

“Alagna descended into full-fledged grassy knoll paranoia talking about mysterious threatening phone calls, unknown figures making karate chop motions in his direction as he entered the theater Sunday night, and other signs that the La Scala was conspiring to force him out. When that didn’t fly, he gave physical problems a whirl — my throat closed up, my blood sugar plummeted, why didn’t Chailly stop the performance to check on me?; that’s what Muti did when Domingo nearly fainted in ‘Otello’ — they could wait an hour for Domingo and not a few minutes for me?, and who was that mysterious tenor in full costume warming up in my dressing room when I came in Sunday night?”

Now Corriere reports that Thursday evening, since he had been replaced onstage, Alagna took to the piazza in front of the opera house to stage his own ‘one-man show’ in piazza!

“Presenting himself a few minutes before the beginning of the performance inside of Aida, Alagna began to sing his part, surrounded by curious onlookers and photographers.

Then, looking at il Teatro La Scala, he sang a passage from Puccini’s Madame Butterfly
«Addio fiorito asil, di letizia e d’amore»
.
Goodbye flowered exile, of joy and love!


Then with his cell phone, he snapped a photo of the theater. ‘I came to have a reminder, my last happy memory of la Scala, since I don’t know when I’ll be able to see her again.'”

Ah Italia!
Wish I’d been there. You know I like piazza life.
Sunday eve I did pass through Chicago’s Piazza San Giovanni. A few drunk guys were singing about football….

-E

Alagna story via.

02/15/2006

The most urban Skyspace by James Turrell, ever.



The skyspace by James Turrell at the very busy intersection of Roosevelt Road and Halsted Street in Chicago, near the University of Illinois at Chicago, where the College of Architecture and the Arts commissioned this. This is what you see looking up through it.

Here’s another view.

Just kidding, that’s the ceiling of a wine shop on Wells St.

The skyspace is supposed to heighten your perception of the sky, its colors and its meaning. Turrell is a fine artist, see this and this .

Ours, here in Chicago, on the campus of the University of Illinois at Chicago is not finished, so one can’t judge, but the first mistake to me, seems to be that our skyspace is not a peaceful place. Since it’s open to the busy streets around it


you hear all the noise. It has “that Pantheon thing” going for it — rounded, open at the top, a nice spot of light moves with the sun, but at the Pantheon you enter a world, a universe, since it’s self-contained. And the only way out is up – to where live the gods. I guess we’re more democratic than that so here you can also look out straight ahead, at life around you; and we have security concerns, so we couldn’t really close off all the walls. Oh well.

The structure itself – not pretty. The benches look (almost vintage UIC!)like this:

And, like the Pantheon in Roma, the skyspace at Roosevelt and Halsted (just doesn’t sound the same, does it? as, “the Pantheon in Roma”) our skyspace casts a moving spot of light, which looks like this

at one particular moment in time. Never again. That’s part of it. Since the opening is oval-shaped, unlike at the Pantheon where it’s a perfect circle, here the sun takes on a nice Jean Arp-like amorphous shape.

The structure, as you see above, does have that Italian thing going for it. As does a restaurant not far away, on Taylor Street!

Back to the Skyspace. It’s done in a Burnt Siena color. Actually it reminds me of

a little-known structure by Brunelleschi (who of course also designed the famous and stirring dome of Florence Cathedral) – the only picture of which I have, includes me in it! Sorry. See the Brunelleschi in the background?

And why is their piazza (and pizza) so much better than ours?
Because they’re Italian!
But tomorrow’s post will be about — Piazza DiMaggio
at least that’s what I call it – here in Chicago on Taylor Street.

‘Til then, “Cin, Cin!”
-Eduardissimo