Archive for the ‘Skidmore’ Category

New Directions at SOM. Aren’t they still going up?

03/29/2008

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01/12/2007

Adrian talks, Myron displayed

Adrian Smith in Metropolis magazine on leaving Skidmore, setting up his own shop, and what he wants to do with it,

“Gordon (Gill) and I want to do research that we can apply to buildings, and we want to collaborate with the local Chicago universities, but we also want to work with organizations like Boeing, NASA, and others that can help advance the technology of energy-producing mechanisms. For example, there are a couple of usable wind-turbine devices for buildings, but they really aren’t ­optimum. Who else better than the airplane industry to help us develop a turbine?

And on what he learned from Skidmore greats,

“With Walter Netsch, I learned what not to do. (Laughs.) There was a strong rigor that Walter had that I think boxed me in to solutions that were not necessarily solutions that solved clients’ problems. I learned from Bruce how one can be innovative and yet responsive to a client. And I also learned some aspects of what not to do. He was very condescending to his clients at times. Myron Goldsmith was a man of few words, but when he said something, it really meant something. He had a huge influence on my character.

If you’re in Chicago between Febrary and April 13 see “Memories of Myron Goldsmith” at The Arts Club of Chicago – which you ought to see anyway. The exhibition will feature large-scale photographs of works by Goldsmith, ranging from the Cook County Administration Building (facing Chicago’s Picasso statue) to



the Republic newspaper building in Columbus, Indiana.

And I love to link to the Art Institute’s oral histories,
here’s Myron Goldsmith’s.
I find them invaluable, and lively reading!

best,
-E


Top photo from Adrian Smith + Gordon Gill Architecture

01/12/2007

Adrian talks, Myron displayed

Adrian Smith in Metropolis magazine on leaving Skidmore, setting up his own shop, and what he wants to do with it,

“Gordon (Gill) and I want to do research that we can apply to buildings, and we want to collaborate with the local Chicago universities, but we also want to work with organizations like Boeing, NASA, and others that can help advance the technology of energy-producing mechanisms. For example, there are a couple of usable wind-turbine devices for buildings, but they really aren’t ­optimum. Who else better than the airplane industry to help us develop a turbine?

And on what he learned from Skidmore greats,

“With Walter Netsch, I learned what not to do. (Laughs.) There was a strong rigor that Walter had that I think boxed me in to solutions that were not necessarily solutions that solved clients’ problems. I learned from Bruce how one can be innovative and yet responsive to a client. And I also learned some aspects of what not to do. He was very condescending to his clients at times. Myron Goldsmith was a man of few words, but when he said something, it really meant something. He had a huge influence on my character.

If you’re in Chicago between Febrary and April 13 see “Memories of Myron Goldsmith” at The Arts Club of Chicago – which you ought to see anyway. The exhibition will feature large-scale photographs of works by Goldsmith, ranging from the Cook County Administration Building (facing Chicago’s Picasso statue) to



the Republic newspaper building in Columbus, Indiana.

And I love to link to the Art Institute’s oral histories,
here’s Myron Goldsmith’s.
I find them invaluable, and lively reading!

best,
-E


Top photo from Adrian Smith + Gordon Gill Architecture

01/12/2007

Adrian talks, Myron displayed

Adrian Smith in Metropolis magazine on leaving Skidmore, setting up his own shop, and what he wants to do with it,

“Gordon (Gill) and I want to do research that we can apply to buildings, and we want to collaborate with the local Chicago universities, but we also want to work with organizations like Boeing, NASA, and others that can help advance the technology of energy-producing mechanisms. For example, there are a couple of usable wind-turbine devices for buildings, but they really aren’t ­optimum. Who else better than the airplane industry to help us develop a turbine?

And on what he learned from Skidmore greats,

“With Walter Netsch, I learned what not to do. (Laughs.) There was a strong rigor that Walter had that I think boxed me in to solutions that were not necessarily solutions that solved clients’ problems. I learned from Bruce how one can be innovative and yet responsive to a client. And I also learned some aspects of what not to do. He was very condescending to his clients at times. Myron Goldsmith was a man of few words, but when he said something, it really meant something. He had a huge influence on my character.

If you’re in Chicago between Febrary and April 13 see “Memories of Myron Goldsmith” at The Arts Club of Chicago – which you ought to see anyway. The exhibition will feature large-scale photographs of works by Goldsmith, ranging from the Cook County Administration Building (facing Chicago’s Picasso statue) to



the Republic newspaper building in Columbus, Indiana.

And I love to link to the Art Institute’s oral histories,
here’s Myron Goldsmith’s.
I find them invaluable, and lively reading!

best,
-E


Top photo from Adrian Smith + Gordon Gill Architecture

01/10/2007

Will Lee Bey ‘diss’ Skidmore on the radio?

Tune in and find out. He’ll be my guest this week on my radio show Hello Beautiful!

Lee left Skidmore’s Chicago office not long ago.
What’s he going to do next? The man just keeps re-inventing himself; it’s beautiful to see.

“Lee Bey was an award-winning architecture critic for the Chicago Sun-Times from 1996 to 2001.
From 2001 to 2004, he served as deputy chief of staff for Chicago Mayor Richard M. Daley. Lee Bey advised the mayor on architecture and urban planning while helping shape the administration’s position on development, lakefront protection, park construction and preservation.
In 2004, Bey joined architecture firm Skidmore, Owings & Merrill as director of media and governmental affairs.”


Find out what he’s up to, and what he thinks of the current architecture scene, who his favorite designers are, and what he thinks of the architecture criticism he reads. Hey, he’s free to speak his mind now, right?

Tune in “The candid Mr. Bey” – streaming Friday afternoon at chicagopublicradio.org, and broadcast Sunday at ten am on Chicago Public Radio.

And for a sneak peek into his mind, visit LeeBey.com

‘Til then,
-Edoardo

01/10/2007

Will Lee Bey ‘diss’ Skidmore on the radio?

Tune in and find out. He’ll be my guest this week on my radio show Hello Beautiful!

Lee left Skidmore’s Chicago office not long ago.
What’s he going to do next? The man just keeps re-inventing himself; it’s beautiful to see.

“Lee Bey was an award-winning architecture critic for the Chicago Sun-Times from 1996 to 2001.
From 2001 to 2004, he served as deputy chief of staff for Chicago Mayor Richard M. Daley. Lee Bey advised the mayor on architecture and urban planning while helping shape the administration’s position on development, lakefront protection, park construction and preservation.
In 2004, Bey joined architecture firm Skidmore, Owings & Merrill as director of media and governmental affairs.”


Find out what he’s up to, and what he thinks of the current architecture scene, who his favorite designers are, and what he thinks of the architecture criticism he reads. Hey, he’s free to speak his mind now, right?

Tune in “The candid Mr. Bey” – streaming Friday afternoon at chicagopublicradio.org, and broadcast Sunday at ten am on Chicago Public Radio.

And for a sneak peek into his mind, visit LeeBey.com

‘Til then,
-Edoardo

01/10/2007

Will Lee Bey ‘diss’ Skidmore on the radio?

Tune in and find out. He’ll be my guest this week on my radio show Hello Beautiful!

Lee left Skidmore’s Chicago office not long ago.
What’s he going to do next? The man just keeps re-inventing himself; it’s beautiful to see.

“Lee Bey was an award-winning architecture critic for the Chicago Sun-Times from 1996 to 2001.
From 2001 to 2004, he served as deputy chief of staff for Chicago Mayor Richard M. Daley. Lee Bey advised the mayor on architecture and urban planning while helping shape the administration’s position on development, lakefront protection, park construction and preservation.
In 2004, Bey joined architecture firm Skidmore, Owings & Merrill as director of media and governmental affairs.”


Find out what he’s up to, and what he thinks of the current architecture scene, who his favorite designers are, and what he thinks of the architecture criticism he reads. Hey, he’s free to speak his mind now, right?

Tune in “The candid Mr. Bey” – streaming Friday afternoon at chicagopublicradio.org, and broadcast Sunday at ten am on Chicago Public Radio.

And for a sneak peek into his mind, visit LeeBey.com

‘Til then,
-Edoardo

11/08/2006


The Magazine of the Moment

Architect magazine

Didn’t I say, just last month, keep your eyes on Ross Wimer?

Now you can. Yesterday I went to visit Ross, to see what new work he’s up to. On my way there, on the newstand I spot the magazine above!

Daily Dose notwithstanding, this is the magazine of the moment.

The premiere edition of Architect magazine.

And on the cover, Ross.

Well the new work he showed me is even better looking….

Including a great LED street lamp, of twisted steel. Very elegant.
Mayor Daley, while you’re talking to Ross about the Olympics, you ought to ask him about the streetlight he’s got that would make our town look instantly more chic. Both because of the pole itself (better than those standard issue highway lights we’ve got all over town) and because they’d cast a whiter, less yellow light.

Ross also showed great buildings SOM is designing. But I’m not allowed to divulge yet…

Til soon then, and pick up Architecture magazine. It’s edited by the former curator of the Chicago Architecture Foundation, our friend, Ned Cramer. Here’s his new blog, which includes this explainer:

“ARCHITECT will celebrate the people—famous and otherwise—who get buildings built. Moreover, because the profession of architecture doesn’t exist in a vacuum, ARCHITECT will introduce its readers not just to other architects, but to those strange creatures who labor on the periphery, such as contractors, real estate developers, and building-product manufacturers.”

The article featuring Ross is well-written, by a friend, the wonderful Cindy Coleman. Click here to read it.

Big Congrats to all involved. But I’m sure it’s not as hard as starting a blog! (smile. Ned’s been working for months on this premiere issue.)

– Tell ’em Edward sent you.

UPDATE: Another blog on the site of Architect says,

“The first issue even has a steamy profile picture of SOM partner Ross Wimer. To the best of my knowledge the ambition is for this publication to finally rupture the periodical gates and compete with likes of Vanity Fair, Stuff and USWeekly. We’ll see if it pays off.”

-Sheesh

11/08/2006


The Magazine of the Moment

Architect magazine

Didn’t I say, just last month, keep your eyes on Ross Wimer?

Now you can. Yesterday I went to visit Ross, to see what new work he’s up to. On my way there, on the newstand I spot the magazine above!

Daily Dose notwithstanding, this is the magazine of the moment.

The premiere edition of Architect magazine.

And on the cover, Ross.

Well the new work he showed me is even better looking….

Including a great LED street lamp, of twisted steel. Very elegant.
Mayor Daley, while you’re talking to Ross about the Olympics, you ought to ask him about the streetlight he’s got that would make our town look instantly more chic. Both because of the pole itself (better than those standard issue highway lights we’ve got all over town) and because they’d cast a whiter, less yellow light.

Ross also showed great buildings SOM is designing. But I’m not allowed to divulge yet…

Til soon then, and pick up Architecture magazine. It’s edited by the former curator of the Chicago Architecture Foundation, our friend, Ned Cramer. Here’s his new blog, which includes this explainer:

“ARCHITECT will celebrate the people—famous and otherwise—who get buildings built. Moreover, because the profession of architecture doesn’t exist in a vacuum, ARCHITECT will introduce its readers not just to other architects, but to those strange creatures who labor on the periphery, such as contractors, real estate developers, and building-product manufacturers.”

The article featuring Ross is well-written, by a friend, the wonderful Cindy Coleman. Click here to read it.

Big Congrats to all involved. But I’m sure it’s not as hard as starting a blog! (smile. Ned’s been working for months on this premiere issue.)

– Tell ’em Edward sent you.

UPDATE: Another blog on the site of Architect says,

“The first issue even has a steamy profile picture of SOM partner Ross Wimer. To the best of my knowledge the ambition is for this publication to finally rupture the periodical gates and compete with likes of Vanity Fair, Stuff and USWeekly. We’ll see if it pays off.”

-Sheesh

11/08/2006


The Magazine of the Moment

Architect magazine

Didn’t I say, just last month, keep your eyes on Ross Wimer?

Now you can. Yesterday I went to visit Ross, to see what new work he’s up to. On my way there, on the newstand I spot the magazine above!

Daily Dose notwithstanding, this is the magazine of the moment.

The premiere edition of Architect magazine.

And on the cover, Ross.

Well the new work he showed me is even better looking….

Including a great LED street lamp, of twisted steel. Very elegant.
Mayor Daley, while you’re talking to Ross about the Olympics, you ought to ask him about the streetlight he’s got that would make our town look instantly more chic. Both because of the pole itself (better than those standard issue highway lights we’ve got all over town) and because they’d cast a whiter, less yellow light.

Ross also showed great buildings SOM is designing. But I’m not allowed to divulge yet…

Til soon then, and pick up Architecture magazine. It’s edited by the former curator of the Chicago Architecture Foundation, our friend, Ned Cramer. Here’s his new blog, which includes this explainer:

“ARCHITECT will celebrate the people—famous and otherwise—who get buildings built. Moreover, because the profession of architecture doesn’t exist in a vacuum, ARCHITECT will introduce its readers not just to other architects, but to those strange creatures who labor on the periphery, such as contractors, real estate developers, and building-product manufacturers.”

The article featuring Ross is well-written, by a friend, the wonderful Cindy Coleman. Click here to read it.

Big Congrats to all involved. But I’m sure it’s not as hard as starting a blog! (smile. Ned’s been working for months on this premiere issue.)

– Tell ’em Edward sent you.

UPDATE: Another blog on the site of Architect says,

“The first issue even has a steamy profile picture of SOM partner Ross Wimer. To the best of my knowledge the ambition is for this publication to finally rupture the periodical gates and compete with likes of Vanity Fair, Stuff and USWeekly. We’ll see if it pays off.”

-Sheesh