Archive for the ‘Tate’ Category

12/19/2006

Retail follows Art
This scene on Michigan Avenue in Chicago, these bright lights intended to get you in,


recalls for me
Olafur Eliasson’s Weather Project from ’03/’04, at the Tate Modern in London.

Except that shopping chez Vuitton is much more spiritual.

wink, wink.
-E

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12/19/2006

Retail follows Art
This scene on Michigan Avenue in Chicago, these bright lights intended to get you in,


recalls for me
Olafur Eliasson’s Weather Project from ’03/’04, at the Tate Modern in London.

Except that shopping chez Vuitton is much more spiritual.

wink, wink.
-E

12/19/2006

Retail follows Art
This scene on Michigan Avenue in Chicago, these bright lights intended to get you in,


recalls for me
Olafur Eliasson’s Weather Project from ’03/’04, at the Tate Modern in London.

Except that shopping chez Vuitton is much more spiritual.

wink, wink.
-E

11/01/2006


Tate vs. MoMa

Must read: Roberta Smith in today’s Times
on what Tate Modern in London did right (>),
(<) and what MoMA in New York did wrong.

A money graf: “Architecture is destiny. It forms an extremely tangible mission statement that communicates an institution’s core values. In a sense, trophy museums like MoMA are telling us all to get lost. Their design aims to impress rich collectors and, in fact, they feel rather like some rich collectors’ houses: angular, fragile and clueless about how daily life is really lived, much less how art actually happens.”

… “Yoshio Taniguchi’s MoMA is a beautiful building that plainly doesn’t work. The Tate Modern is a plain one that is working beautifully.”

Well said.
-E

11/01/2006


Tate vs. MoMa

Must read: Roberta Smith in today’s Times
on what Tate Modern in London did right (>),
(<) and what MoMA in New York did wrong.

A money graf: “Architecture is destiny. It forms an extremely tangible mission statement that communicates an institution’s core values. In a sense, trophy museums like MoMA are telling us all to get lost. Their design aims to impress rich collectors and, in fact, they feel rather like some rich collectors’ houses: angular, fragile and clueless about how daily life is really lived, much less how art actually happens.”

… “Yoshio Taniguchi’s MoMA is a beautiful building that plainly doesn’t work. The Tate Modern is a plain one that is working beautifully.”

Well said.
-E