Archive for the ‘Tigerman’ Category

Stanley Tigerman’s Holocaust Museum and Education Center in Skokie, Illinois

01/12/2009

Due to open in April 19, 2009. The top view is taken from the Edens Expressway, I-94, which is how most people will first see the Illinois Holocaust Museum & Education Center.

When you visit you’ll park in an adjacent lot (many school groups are expected), get out of your car, and be greeted by

It does seem to eat you up a bit.

Now walk around the side of the building. Their website tells us,

“Visitors enter on the dark side, where dark walls and sharp angles represent ‘the descent into darkness.’ The permanent exhibition begins in the dark side.

The “hinge” of the building is an awe-inspiring Book of Remembrance, and is the memorial to those who perished in the Holocaust. The “cleave” formed by the hinge between dark and light, houses an authentic early 20th century German rail car that serves as the museum’s anchor artifact.”

The third part of the building “ascends into the light.” The soft rounded edges and rooflines filled with natural light emphasize exhibits that represent the rescue and renewal of survivors of the Holocaust.”

The 65,000-square-foot facility will be anchored by a permanent exhibition to tell the story of the Holocaust. It also will house a “Hall of Reflection,” a 300-seat theater and a library.

Do you remember the Chicago northern suburb of Skokie? After World War Two it held one of the largest concentration of Holocaust survivors in the world. (For years Skokie had signs saying, “World’s Largest Village.” Michael Feldman of Public Radio’s “WhadYa Know?” called it “World’s Largest Shtetl.” In 1977 and 1978, a small group of Illinois Nazis attempted to march there. The issue went to court, ultimately the fools marched in Chicago.


Today the Holocaust survivors in Skokie are fewer in number, although many of their descendants still live in and around the far more multi-cultural village today.

Here’s another view of Stanley Tigerman‘s building, seen next to David Hovey / Optima’s large condo complex. They both abut a large Cook County Forest Preserve. You see the two parts of Stanley Tigerman’s building.
The dark and the light. I look forward to its opening this April.
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Martin Felsen & Sarah Dunn get Archeworks!

01/17/2008


The important design school for social concerns started by Stanley Tigerman and Eva Maddox.

We are told: “Under the leadership of Dunn and Felsen, Archeworks will operate as a do-tank to engage in an international discussion of the future of cities.”

Congratulations! You’ve been having a great year or two.

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05/19/2007

Bruce Mau told me last night,

at the superbly fun benefit for Stanley Tigerman and Eva Maddox’s Archeworks,

that he is moving with his family to Chicago in July. He’ll open a school called
“The Institute for Massive Change.”

He’ll put it in Louis Sullivan’s inspiring department store building on State Street. Carson’s – the store in there for decades, recently vacated. Mau’s school will be in the same building as, and he will team up with Tony Jones and The School of the Art Institute of Chicago, which recently began teaching architecture on the top floors of the Sullivan masterpiece.

Bruce Mau said he intends to focus his activities on cities. He plans to develop “Chicago prototypes.” He hopes city planners and leaders around the world will note his achievements here, come here to study them, and then replicate them where needed. He told me that a developer working on a project in Korea wants to fund the prototype here, and if or when it’s successful, replicate the solution in Korea. I have no more details on that.

Mau will live on Chicago’s North Shore; he’s looking for a grand old house to turn “smart.” With all the visitors he expects he joked it’ll be something of an “eco-resort.” Tell that to the good ladies of Winnetka.

How did this come about? Bruce Mau said that he was gratified by the welcome he received in Chicago when he brought his exhibtion “Massive Change” to the Museum of Contemporary Art. He had lunch with Stanley Tigerman. Tigerman asked him, “What are you doing? Why aren’t you here?” Tigerman told Mau he could accomplish in ten years in Chicago what it would take him forty years to acheive in Toronto. Next thing you know, Mau’s moving his family to Chi-town and opening a school here.

Bruce Mau says he’s a big fan of Mayor Daley and the work he’s doing to make Chicago more “green.” Daley is also a fan of Mau and his work.

Finally, Bruce Mau says it’s too late to tone down the expectations people have for him, but that he’ll work here to realize his dreams here.

The “City of Broad Shoulders,” “the City that Works;” the city of “Make no Little Plans,” and “Build, Don’t Talk,” welcomes its latest big thinker. I’m so glad to see him come here and help spur the Chicago Renaissance.

Remember, Chicago’s motto has always been, “Urbs in Horto” – “City in a garden.”

Welcome Bruce Mau and family. Make the place grow.
-E

02/02/2007

Have architects lost their moral bearings?
asks

Tigerman goes green.

“Architects have power. Make no mistake.”
– Stanley Tigerman.
Read all about it.

02/02/2007

Have architects lost their moral bearings?
asks

Tigerman goes green.

“Architects have power. Make no mistake.”
– Stanley Tigerman.
Read all about it.

11/06/2006

Go Stanley! Go Helmut!

Nonprofit housing.

Here’s that story I told you was coming from the New York Times.

Money graf:

“Chicago has the most vibrant nonprofit housing community in the country,” said Henry G. Cisneros, the former housing secretary during the Clinton administration and a prominent advocate of affordable housing. “If you want to talk about a city with a comprehensive approach to housing and ending homelessness, Chicago kind of sets the pace right now.”

The projects also showcase what is turning into another tradition in the city, that of sustainable, or green, design.

Photos: William Zbaren for The New York Times

11/06/2006

Go Stanley! Go Helmut!

Nonprofit housing.

Here’s that story I told you was coming from the New York Times.

Money graf:

“Chicago has the most vibrant nonprofit housing community in the country,” said Henry G. Cisneros, the former housing secretary during the Clinton administration and a prominent advocate of affordable housing. “If you want to talk about a city with a comprehensive approach to housing and ending homelessness, Chicago kind of sets the pace right now.”

The projects also showcase what is turning into another tradition in the city, that of sustainable, or green, design.

Photos: William Zbaren for The New York Times

11/06/2006

Go Stanley! Go Helmut!

Nonprofit housing.

Here’s that story I told you was coming from the New York Times.

Money graf:

“Chicago has the most vibrant nonprofit housing community in the country,” said Henry G. Cisneros, the former housing secretary during the Clinton administration and a prominent advocate of affordable housing. “If you want to talk about a city with a comprehensive approach to housing and ending homelessness, Chicago kind of sets the pace right now.”

The projects also showcase what is turning into another tradition in the city, that of sustainable, or green, design.

Photos: William Zbaren for The New York Times

10/27/2006

The Right Angle. We’re always ahead of the curve.

Look for Stanley Tigerman and Helmut Jahn

in the New York Times early in November.
For a story on sustainable architecture.

Of course, we wrote about Helmut’s ‘green’ Chicago social housing project, way back in July. And in August.

I hope the NYT covers the fine show at Chicago’s Museum of Contemporary Art, Sustainable Architecture in Chicago.

Gone with the Wind,
-Edward

10/27/2006

The Right Angle. We’re always ahead of the curve.

Look for Stanley Tigerman and Helmut Jahn

in the New York Times early in November.
For a story on sustainable architecture.

Of course, we wrote about Helmut’s ‘green’ Chicago social housing project, way back in July. And in August.

I hope the NYT covers the fine show at Chicago’s Museum of Contemporary Art, Sustainable Architecture in Chicago.

Gone with the Wind,
-Edward