Archive for the ‘Tyler Green’ Category

Trains, cranes and museums

11/18/2008

Tyler Green says of Jeff Koons’ project for outside LACMA, the L.A. County Museum of Art,


“This is unrelated to the proposed Koons ‘train’ at LACMA, but what the heck…


I like that “rhyme” and wish I’d thought of it (after all, Montparnasse, where this occurred, was my train station when I lived in Paris and that image was all around)

but Koon’s project to me has always “rhymed with”


Moshe Safdie’s design (unbuilt) for the Stuttgart Museum of Contemporary Art (1990).

Unlike Koon’s proposal, Safdie’s had a practical function

“Served by a giant crane, the temporary galleries could be moved and transferred to off-site storage when not in use…. When not being used, the crane would stand motionless like a spire, but would appear to transform itself into a symbol of change while in use, as it swung to position new works or convert temporary galleries for upcoming exhibitions.”


And unlike L.A., Stuttgart does not suffer earthquakes, that I know of.

And although it’s very different in tone, reason and purpose – while we’re talking Moshe Safdie, let’s remember, with respect, that a little later, around 1991 – 1994, he designed the Yad Vashem Transports Memorial.



(Click on either catalog image to enlarge it.)
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Save the Spiral Jetty

01/30/2008

It’s threatened, by oil drilling!

Tyler writes,

The comment period has been extended by the Utah government to Feb. 13.

If you want to send a letter of protest to save the beautiful, natural Utah environment around the Spiral Jetty from oil drilling, the emails or calls of protest go to Jonathan Jemming 801-537-9023 jjemming@utah.gov. Please refer to Application # 8853. Every letter makes a big difference, they do take a lot of notice and know that publicity may follow. Since (artist Robert Smithson’s) Spiral Jetty has global significance, emails from foreign countries would be of special value.

Please do. Help straighten out those who would desecrate the Spiral Jetty.
.

12/15/2007

Mies and the National Gallery of Art in Washington

Tyler breaks the story that the National Gallery of Art seeks to expand into the nearby Federal Trade Commission headquarters.
That’s great, I hope it happens. The NGA needs more room and adding a public building to the mall would enliven the area. Since 9-11 and the new security measures around DC buildings, and more restricted access, the mall is less animated than it had been, near the government bureau buildings.

But did Tyler forget his own terrific idea?

Use Mies’ Martin Luther King library (4 blocks away) as a wing of the National Gallery in which to show contemporary art.


Tyler says contemporary, I say modern and contemporary, but wouldn’t it be great to see art in there?

The DC building needs to be saved, and restored. If not as a library, then why not a gallery? And I know who should do the restoration work.

A new New National Gallery by Ludwig Mies van der Rohe?

03/27/2007

The old New National Gallery by Ludwig Mies van der Rohe


The new New National Gallery by Ludwig Mies van der Rohe?


Tyler has a very good idea. And today is Mies’ birthday. Let’s gift him Tyler’s idea!

-E

03/24/2007

The ugliest building you’ll ever see on this site!

Only so we can talk about
Five buildings that could be movies.

This is Thomas Kinkade’s painting, “The Christmas Cottage.”
(How horrid!)

The painting is being made into a movie.

This inspired Tyler Green to think about five good paintings that could be movies,
and he blogged about it on his fine site. Tyler also links to others who chose five.

So now I’m interested in “Five buildings that could be movies.”

What do you think?

One on my list would be by Frank Lloyd Wright (his work is very cinematic), Fallingwater? Unity Temple?

Another would be the New National Gallery by Mies. Each pane of glass at ground level looks like a film frame. Just watch someone walk around them. It’s a movie. And give it an Oscar for best lighting! Of course the sound isn’t great, with those large parallel walls of glass. Mies is said to have said, “If it’s good sound you want, go to Philharmonie” (The concert hall by Hans Scharoun just down the street. (1.)

But it’s late now, and I have to prepare for my interview for this year’s Pritzker Prize laureate – to be announced Wednesday – so right now I can’t choose my “Five buildings that could be movies.”

How about you, which would you cite?
Help me out here.

-Edward

1. Phyllis Lambert told me this.

02/16/2007

Tyler makes me think. He asks, “What are our five favorite buildings in America, that are publicly accessible? “ The list was not easy to make. We are blessed with great buildings in this land. From California, to the New York Island. But we’ll give it a try.

All this was prompted by this crazy AIA list of “the people’s” favorite buildings in America.

So here’s ours, in reverse order of favorites.

If Tyler wants to name the St. Louis arch, then I’ll choose as

#5. “Cloud Gate” in Millennium Park, Chicago, by Anish Kapoor.

Tyler says the arch is the best piece of public art in America. He might be right, it is sublime and thoughtful and delightfully modernist. But is it superior to the Vietnam Veterans Memorial in D.C., the Statue of Liberty, or “the bean?” “The bean,” Cloud Gate, is also a gate, not seen in the pic above, and as I’ve written, it expresses Einsteinian space, the relationship of the individual to the collective, of the individual to the self, the relationship of heaven to earth and light to solid, and it gorgeously displays the celestial passage of time. Not bad for a single object. I’ll vote for it as a “favorite building” also to show how architecture and sculpture are wedded these days.

4. Fallingwater and Robie House, by Frank Lloyd Wright.

I could have listed Wright’s Guggenheim, Unity Temple, or Johnson Wax, but I’ll choose these two domestic symphonies. They’re exhilirating to walk through, to experience the blend of nature and flowing space and important for their attempt to fashion domestic harmony (would that it were!). I could have listed only the obvious masterpiece Fallingwater, but I know
Robie House better and for its urban location and size it would be an easier model for more people to follow. Would that urban and suburban dwellings were built with such sensitivity and artistry today.

3. The Auditorium Building, by Louis Sullivan.

A powerful, beautiful statement of the importance of bringing culture at the highest levels to all the people. A gesamtkunstwerk by “unser Lieber Meister,” if ever there was one. In there more than anywhere else in the world, one feels, “Ars Longis, Vita Brevis.” And it’s thrilling. When the performance is moving, say, the Joffrey dancing Balanchine’s “Apollo”, one looks up at the space under the golden, electrically lit arches above, and has a taste of what heaven will be like.

2. 860 – 880 Lake Shore Drive Apartments, by Ludwig Mies van der Rohe.

Mies’ work was left off the AIA/people’s list of favorite buildings, but his solutions to find dignity and poetry in modern, industrial life are unrivalled. I always live in large cities, and can only afford to live in a high-rise. If I could live in any high-rise anywhere, I’d like to live in 860 – 880 N. Lake Shore Drive in Chicago. Oh, wait a minute, I do live there. I’ve been there 5 years. Each day is magic. The ways the two halves of the whole play off of each other, in unfolding overlapping ever-sliding planes. The way the I-beams rise up the sides, create depth and when you walk around the buildings, cause the facades to seem to open and close. The crystalline cleansing of walking through the lobby. The serenity of looking out through my magic windows, through which the city takes on a perfection. After 5 years, I still hear music from these works of art.

And, as of today, my number one pick for my favorite building in America is:


1. The Farnsworth House, by Mies.

Plato would be jealous. The Farnsworth incarnates, in space, light and a few fine materials, mostly in pure white, the perfect idea of the modern house. Whether it works well or not is another issue. I love to sit inside and contemplate the ever-changing nature outside, and the nature of life, lived in a modern way – is that possible? – inside. Space and time flow through one, inside this lantern, this beacon, this jewel in the woods. It is more beautiful, more shocking, more perfect than you, or even Plato, could imagine. A true Temple of Love to love. Adding to it’s allure is that it’s unattainable now that it’s owned by the National Trust and Landmarks Illinois. When it was for sale recently was the only time I’ve ever played the lottery.

What’s your list?

I thought of mine off the top of my head, I’m sure I’ll argue with myself as soon as I post this. What didn’t make my list, but could have?
For a religious building – Eero Saarinen’s chapel at MIT.
For a library – Louis Kahn at Phillips Exeter Academy.

There you go.
Now let’s build more good ones!
-E

02/16/2007

Tyler makes me think. He asks, “What are our five favorite buildings in America, that are publicly accessible? “ The list was not easy to make. We are blessed with great buildings in this land. From California, to the New York Island. But we’ll give it a try.

All this was prompted by this crazy AIA list of “the people’s” favorite buildings in America.

So here’s ours, in reverse order of favorites.

If Tyler wants to name the St. Louis arch, then I’ll choose as

#5. “Cloud Gate” in Millennium Park, Chicago, by Anish Kapoor.

Tyler says the arch is the best piece of public art in America. He might be right, it is sublime and thoughtful and delightfully modernist. But is it superior to the Vietnam Veterans Memorial in D.C., the Statue of Liberty, or “the bean?” “The bean,” Cloud Gate, is also a gate, not seen in the pic above, and as I’ve written, it expresses Einsteinian space, the relationship of the individual to the collective, of the individual to the self, the relationship of heaven to earth and light to solid, and it gorgeously displays the celestial passage of time. Not bad for a single object. I’ll vote for it as a “favorite building” also to show how architecture and sculpture are wedded these days.

4. Fallingwater and Robie House, by Frank Lloyd Wright.

I could have listed Wright’s Guggenheim, Unity Temple, or Johnson Wax, but I’ll choose these two domestic symphonies. They’re exhilirating to walk through, to experience the blend of nature and flowing space and important for their attempt to fashion domestic harmony (would that it were!). I could have listed only the obvious masterpiece Fallingwater, but I know
Robie House better and for its urban location and size it would be an easier model for more people to follow. Would that urban and suburban dwellings were built with such sensitivity and artistry today.

3. The Auditorium Building, by Louis Sullivan.

A powerful, beautiful statement of the importance of bringing culture at the highest levels to all the people. A gesamtkunstwerk by “unser Lieber Meister,” if ever there was one. In there more than anywhere else in the world, one feels, “Ars Longis, Vita Brevis.” And it’s thrilling. When the performance is moving, say, the Joffrey dancing Balanchine’s “Apollo”, one looks up at the space under the golden, electrically lit arches above, and has a taste of what heaven will be like.

2. 860 – 880 Lake Shore Drive Apartments, by Ludwig Mies van der Rohe.

Mies’ work was left off the AIA/people’s list of favorite buildings, but his solutions to find dignity and poetry in modern, industrial life are unrivalled. I always live in large cities, and can only afford to live in a high-rise. If I could live in any high-rise anywhere, I’d like to live in 860 – 880 N. Lake Shore Drive in Chicago. Oh, wait a minute, I do live there. I’ve been there 5 years. Each day is magic. The ways the two halves of the whole play off of each other, in unfolding overlapping ever-sliding planes. The way the I-beams rise up the sides, create depth and when you walk around the buildings, cause the facades to seem to open and close. The crystalline cleansing of walking through the lobby. The serenity of looking out through my magic windows, through which the city takes on a perfection. After 5 years, I still hear music from these works of art.

And, as of today, my number one pick for my favorite building in America is:


1. The Farnsworth House, by Mies.

Plato would be jealous. The Farnsworth incarnates, in space, light and a few fine materials, mostly in pure white, the perfect idea of the modern house. Whether it works well or not is another issue. I love to sit inside and contemplate the ever-changing nature outside, and the nature of life, lived in a modern way – is that possible? – inside. Space and time flow through one, inside this lantern, this beacon, this jewel in the woods. It is more beautiful, more shocking, more perfect than you, or even Plato, could imagine. A true Temple of Love to love. Adding to it’s allure is that it’s unattainable now that it’s owned by the National Trust and Landmarks Illinois. When it was for sale recently was the only time I’ve ever played the lottery.

What’s your list?

I thought of mine off the top of my head, I’m sure I’ll argue with myself as soon as I post this. What didn’t make my list, but could have?
For a religious building – Eero Saarinen’s chapel at MIT.
For a library – Louis Kahn at Phillips Exeter Academy.

There you go.
Now let’s build more good ones!
-E

Adele a deal

06/20/2006

For only about $135 million Ronald Lauder gets the woman he desired.
Look how beautiful. Adele Bloch-Bauer. But what hides she in her hand ?


Those eyes have seen something, and long to be saved from sadness. Those sensuous lips to kiss, the one odd hand, and the other caressing it. Symbolically man-woman, like the Mona Lisa? That regal nose, that hair, her crown in a field of gold, the opposite of normal – usually the crown is gold. I think Gustav Klimt here emphasizes the Jewishness of Ms. Bloch.

Do those eyes on her dress,recall these, for example, from Mazaltovpages.com?


I think so. Those Jewish “lucky eyes” are supposed to protect against “evil eyes.” Well, she made it through the war and out of Austria! Why does she look better to me safely outside of Austria?

I said she is like a Leonardo woman, mysterious. Here’s a key to the mystery of the painting. You see through her dress! See her figure, right where the eyes are? Such a symbol of voyeurism.


And this is also why she looks somewhat modest, and retreating. She knows we’re looking at her and through her.

Great art works are layered.

The sheer dress, and those images swimming around on it, and whatever mystery we imagine underneath, recalls Leonardo’s Virgin of the Rocks.
In that painting in the water in the foreground, if you look closely you can see little protozoa swimming around; an early pictorial lesson in evolution.

But Adele’s greatest mystery is, what is she hiding from us, in her hand?

That mystery, that secret lends a mystique to her femininity, one perhaps not seen since Mona.

Adele’s right hand is bent and then faces down

the neck of a swan, say, Leonardo’s swan, the one who gets to play with Leda.

(The “Leda and the Swan” are a copy of the painting by Leonardo da Vinci, now lost.)

Remember Adolph Loos was in Vienna at the time, saying, “all art is erotic.” Dr. Freud was also a citizen.

So I feel okay asking, are those opened eggs Klimt has painted on the bottom, like Leonardo did on the left?


I don’t usually see much in reproductions, and I need to run to the Neue Galerie in New York to see Adele, but even in reproductions this one dazzles. Nice dress Ms. Bloch, — Henri Bendel? Instantly my favorite Klimt, and one of my fave paintings.

As for what is in her hand,

the painting, which Klimt spent three years on, shows
her hands twisted near her face to conceal…

a deformed finger.

And yet, $135 million dollars.

She’s worth it.

-Edward. (In love.)

And don’t miss Tyler Green’s exclusive on how Ronald Lauder and the Neue Galerie successfully woo’ed her.
The Story of Adele B,
here.

Leda and the Swan (After Leonardo) Virgin of the Rocks
Cesare da Sesto Leonardo da Vinci
1505-10 1483-86
Oil on panel Oil on panel
Wilton House, Salisbury Mu
sée du Louvre, Paris